Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Java we have written a code:

A a1;
a1 = new A();

How many bytes of memory is reserved when compiler compiles the code:

A a1;
share|improve this question
2  
No memory is reserved when the compiler compiles the code. Memory is allocated when the JVM runs the code. –  Stephen C Nov 8 '09 at 9:45
add comment

10 Answers

That's not specified by the Java standard and thus you should not worry about it.

Technically, references are usually as big as the machine's word size, i.e. 32 bit on a 32 bit machine and 64 bit on a 64 bit machine, though some 64 bit JVMs use special magic to allow 32 bit references.

share|improve this answer
add comment

One pointer's worth of memory is used on the stack. That should be 32 bits (4 bytes) unless your machine's in 64-bits mode.

edit:

I see that some people are confused and think that the A object itself is allocated on the stack. That is not the case in Java: all objects are allocated on the heap (modulo JIT optimizations of course). The line A a1; simply allocates pointer a1, initially set to NULL. The pointer itself is in the stack, though of course what it points to will be on the heap. The later call to new A() will allocate an A object on the heap, and the size of that allocation does depend on what's in A.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A variable reference is a handle to an object on the heap, so it will take up a fixed amount (depending on the JVM implementation). However, just for that line, the compiler may not take up anything, since the variable has not been initialized yet. This is statically checked by the compiler, so it will know when it needs to allocate the variable and may in fact allocate it only when it is first assigned.

If you had a method:

 public static void method() {
    A a1;
 }

I would expect the compiler to optimize it out completely, as it can't do anything with it.

All that being said, in Java programming, you just don't worry about these things, they are determined by the JVM implementation and Java is not suitable for byte-level memory concerns. If you are counting bytes like that, you should be using C or some similarly close-to-the-metal language.

share|improve this answer
add comment

That depends on the platform and the implementation. For a 32-bit platform, a 4 byte pointer is used behind the scenes on object instances, regardless of the size of class A.

Edit:

The Java compiler does not reserve any memory for this, that's the runtime's (to be exact, the JIT's) responsibility.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Was your question: How much space does a reference occupy in Java?

If that's the case I'm not sure, sorry.

A a1;

All the above does is define a local variable on the execution stack so no heap memory is reserved.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Enough to store a reference to any A! :-)

Note that it's generally impossible to know exactly how many bytes a particular implementation will actually use for a particular allocation, even in low-level languages like C: malloc() itself is a function which obviously needs to maintain internal data structures. To avoid fragmentation, it usually allocates a 2^n-sized block of memory. And so on.

If you're concerned about how much memory is actually used, write a sample program, and run it through your profiler.

share|improve this answer
add comment

As has been mentioned, it will use either 32-bits or 64-bits, however if the reference is only placed in a register, it might not use any memory.

share|improve this answer
add comment

A a1; allocates on the stack, not the heap.

However, this is all up to implementation, and is not actually defined, as far as I know.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Even for the amount of memory in the stack, that will depend of what is contained/defined in A.

share|improve this answer
    
All objects are allocated in the heap. The amount needed for a reference from the stack frame to the heap depends only on the system, not the type of object being allocated. –  erickson Aug 28 '09 at 16:28
add comment

null does not occupy any space in memory.

Simply saying int occupies some bytes like float occupies some space in memory.

But for null no space is occupied in memory. Send me details if my answer is wrong.

Try for system.memorrysize() like method in Java.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.