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I need to dynamically allocate some arrays inside the kernel function. How can a I do that?

My code is something like that:

__global__ func(float *grid_d,int n, int nn){  
    int i,j;  
    float x[n],y[nn];  
    //Do some really cool and heavy computations here that takes hours.  
}

But that will not work. If this was inside the host code I could use malloc. cudaMalloc needs a pointer on host, and other on device. Inside the kernel function I don't have the host pointer.

So, what should i do?

If takes too long (some seconds) to allocate all the arrays (I need about 4 of size n and 5 of size nn), this won't be a problem. Since the kernel will probably run for 20 minutes, at least.

Thanks for your attention.

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2  
You probably want to read the section on dynamic memory allocation in device code in the CUDA C programmers guide. This capability requires compute capability 2.0 or greater in your GPU. –  Robert Crovella Nov 20 '12 at 19:10
    
What is the configuration (blocks, threads) you will be running this kernel on? What are the typical ranges of n and nn (for small sizes you might squeeze them into registers, or shared memory). –  P Marecki Nov 22 '12 at 11:03

3 Answers 3

Dynamic memory allocation is only supported on compute capability 2.x and 3.x hardware. You can use either the C++ new keyword or malloc in the kernel, so your example could become:

__global__ func(float *grid_d,int n, int nn){  
    int i,j;  
    float *x = new float[n], *y = new float[nn];   
}

This allocates memory on a local memory runtime heap which has the lifetime of the context, so make sure you free the memory after the kernel finishes running if your intention is not to use the memory again. You should also note that runtime heap memory cannot be accessed directly from the host APIs, so you cannot pass a pointer allocated inside a kernel as an argument to cudaMemcpy, for example.

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@talonmies answered your question on how to dynamically allocate memory within a kernel. This is intended as a supplemental answer, addressing performance of __device__ malloc() and an alternative you might want to consider.

Allocating memory dynamically in the kernel can be tempting because it allows GPU code to look more like CPU code. But it can seriously affect performance. I wrote a self contained test and have included it below. The test launches some 2.6 million threads. Each thread populates 16 integers of global memory with some values derived from the thread index, then sums up the values and returns the sum.

The test implements two approaches. The first approach uses __device__ malloc() and the second approach uses memory that is allocated before the kernel runs.

On my 2.0 device, the kernel runs in 1500ms when using __device__ malloc() and 27ms when using pre-allocated memory. In other words, the test takes 56x longer to run when memory is allocated dynamically within the kernel. The time includes the outer loop cudaMalloc() / cudaFree(), which is not part of the kernel. If the same kernel is launched many times with the same number of threads, as is often the case, the cost of the cudaMalloc() / cudaFree() is amortized over all the kernel launches. That brings the difference even higher, to around 60x.

Speculating, I think that the performance hit is in part caused by implicit serialization. The GPU must probably serialize all simultaneous calls to __device__ malloc() in order to provide separate chunks of memory to each caller.

The version that does not use __device__ malloc() allocates all the GPU memory before running the kernel. A pointer to the memory is passed to the kernel. Each thread calculates an index into the previously allocated memory instead of using a __device__ malloc().

The potential issue with allocating memory up front is that, if only some threads need to allocate memory, and it is not known which threads those are, it will be necessary to allocate memory for all the threads. If there is not enough memory for that, it might be more efficient to reduce the number of threads per kernel call then using __device__ malloc(). Other workarounds would probably end up reimplementing what __device__ malloc() is doing in the background, and would see a similar performance hit.

Test the performance of __device__ malloc():

#include "cuda_runtime.h"
#include "device_launch_parameters.h"
#include <stdio.h>

const int N_ITEMS(16);

#define USE_DYNAMIC_MALLOC

__global__ void test_malloc(int* totals)
{
  int tx(blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x);

  int* s(new int[N_ITEMS]);

  for (int i(0); i < N_ITEMS; ++i) {
    s[i] = tx * i;
  }

  int total(0);
  for (int i(0); i < N_ITEMS; ++i) {
    total += s[i];
  }

  totals[tx] = total;

  delete[] s;
}

__global__ void test_malloc_2(int* items, int* totals)
{
  int tx(blockIdx.x * blockDim.x + threadIdx.x);

  int* s(items + tx * N_ITEMS);

  for (int i(0); i < N_ITEMS; ++i) {
    s[i] = tx * i;
  }

  int total(0);
  for (int i(0); i < N_ITEMS; ++i) {
    total += s[i];
  }

  totals[tx] = total;
}

int main()
{
  cudaError_t cuda_status;

  cudaSetDevice(0);

  int blocks_per_launch(1024 * 10);
  int threads_per_block(256);

  int threads_per_launch(blocks_per_launch * threads_per_block);

  int* totals_d;
  cudaMalloc((void**)&totals_d, threads_per_launch * sizeof(int));

  cudaEvent_t start, stop;
  cudaEventCreate(&start);
  cudaEventCreate(&stop);

  cudaDeviceSynchronize();
  cudaEventRecord(start, 0);

#ifdef USE_DYNAMIC_MALLOC
  cudaDeviceSetLimit(cudaLimitMallocHeapSize, threads_per_launch * N_ITEMS * sizeof(int));

  test_malloc<<<blocks_per_launch, threads_per_block>>>(totals_d);
#else
  int* items_d;
  cudaMalloc((void**)&items_d, threads_per_launch * sizeof(int) * N_ITEMS);

  test_malloc_2<<<blocks_per_launch, threads_per_block>>>(items_d, totals_d);

  cudaFree(items_d);
#endif

  cuda_status = cudaDeviceSynchronize();
  if (cuda_status != cudaSuccess) {
    printf("Error: %d\n", cuda_status);
    exit(1);
  }

  cudaEventRecord(stop, 0);
  cudaEventSynchronize(stop);
  float elapsedTime;
  cudaEventElapsedTime(&elapsedTime, start, stop);

  printf("Elapsed: %f\n", elapsedTime);

  int* totals_h(new int[threads_per_launch]);
  cuda_status = cudaMemcpy(totals_h, totals_d, threads_per_launch * sizeof(int), cudaMemcpyDeviceToHost);
  if (cuda_status != cudaSuccess) {
    printf("Error: %d\n", cuda_status);
    exit(1);
  }

  for (int i(0); i < 10; ++i) {
    printf("%d ", totals_h[i]);
  }
  printf("\n");

  cudaFree(totals_d);
  delete[] totals_h;

  return cuda_status;
}

Output:

C:\rd\projects\test_cuda_malloc\Release>test_cuda_malloc.exe
Elapsed: 27.311169
0 120 240 360 480 600 720 840 960 1080

C:\rd\projects\test_cuda_malloc\Release>test_cuda_malloc.exe
Elapsed: 1516.711914
0 120 240 360 480 600 720 840 960 1080
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You should time the cudaMalloc in the second test. Otherwise you are comparing a car ready to run (second test) to a stopped car in a garage (first test). Both kernels need the same storage requirements. –  pQB Nov 21 '12 at 7:16
    
In addition to pQB objection: your cudaMalloc allocates one large array, and this is compared to allocation of 2.5million small matrices (for each thread one). Such a procedure is of course slower, and a test on CPU shows, that your reported 60x slowdown is actually a good job (I get 1000x times slowdown, provided code does not segfault -- allocator needs to handle so many matrices). Fair test is: allocate same (one) array, (1) per cudaMalloc, (2) per kernel<<<1,1>>>. I see the kernel allocation being slower ~3 times. So this is the true performance hit. –  P Marecki Nov 21 '12 at 9:08
    
@pQB: Thanks. I had left the cudaMalloc() out of the timing, assuming that it would not be measurable. To my surprise, adding it in did cause a change, going from 60x to 56x. I've updated the answer and added a blurb about implications of including the cudaMalloc() / cudaFree() in the timing. –  Roger Dahl Nov 21 '12 at 16:07
1  
@PMarecki: The purpose of the test was to show the performance implications of using __device__ malloc() and to show an alternative way of accomplishing the task for which many would consider __device__ malloc(). The purpose was not to compare the performance of a single cudaMalloc() with a single __device__ malloc(). –  Roger Dahl Nov 21 '12 at 16:14

If the value of n and nn were known before the kernel is called, then why not cudaMalloc the memory on host side and pass in the device memory pointer to the kernel?

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Because each kernel must own one array. –  Granada Nov 21 '12 at 9:56
    
Are you launching multiple kenel concurrently? Couldn't you allocate sufficient space and each kernel just shares part of it? –  Hong Zhou Nov 22 '12 at 6:12
    
if i lauch, for example, 1000 kernels and if i need 10 arrays of size n. The i should make 10 arrays of size n*1000? And share this across the kernels using threadid and blockid? –  Granada Nov 22 '12 at 22:47

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