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Is there any way to lock (synchronize) a row in a two dimensional array in java? I want just to update some entries in one specific row and lock only that row rather than entire array?

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Do you know the index of the row before hand, or do you have a way to determine when you reach that specific row? Also, are you using a regular array, or one of the java collection classes? – Paul Richter Nov 20 '12 at 19:35
    
@Teeg, I am using Java Collection classes (an ArrayList of ArrayList of objects) and i determine the row index before hand. Does java synchronized command can be operated on any granularity of java objects (eg. can i do synchronized { HashMap.get(key),.... } where the key itself is an object or java collection object? – user1622127 Nov 20 '12 at 20:58
    
I haven't done this sort of thing all that much, but I believe Brian Agnew's answer answers that question; he wrote what I was going to write anyways. Its basically wrapping your operations in a synchronized block, no matter how small the operation. Also, I think Bhesh Gurung's answer is very important; it might be easier, and more maintainable, to wrap your array/collection in some kind of manager class, with a synchronized method which does what you're asking about in your question. Either approach should work. – Paul Richter Nov 20 '12 at 21:48

To be clear, you synchronise on an object. To synchronise on the 3rd row of an array (bearing in mind the indexing from 0):

String[][] array = ....
synchronize(array[2]) {
}

for example.

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That's a one-dimensional array. Also, it only protects the object itself, not its position in the array. – CPerkins Nov 20 '12 at 19:36
    
No. It's locking the 3rd row (indexing from zero) – Brian Agnew Nov 20 '12 at 19:38
    
Does that stop another thread from modifying that row? Isn't it just using the row as a lock? – Bhesh Gurung Nov 20 '12 at 19:45
    
@BheshGurung, both are true. – Serg Nov 20 '12 at 20:05
    
It's no different to any other lock. If another thread doesn't try to obtain the monitor then it can do whatever it wants – Brian Agnew Nov 20 '12 at 20:05

We synchronize a block of code, not a data structure.

You should encapsulate that array and synchronize the access to it (according to your requirement), to make it thread-safe.

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+1 for the encapsulation. I think that's important in this scenario – Brian Agnew Nov 20 '12 at 20:06

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