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I am looking for a method to pull input into my program from either a Pipe from the terminal or by specifing a filename as an argument. Effectivly

1. foo | myprogram
OR
2. foo > bar; myprogram -w bar

The second operation is accoplished simply by reading the file. However I am drawing a blank on how to redirect the output from foo into myprogram with a pipe. In all the examples I have managed to find Pipes have been used almost exclusively for IPC from parent to child processes. Am I thinking of the proper Pipe or is this a different mechanism?

I also realize that when foo | myprogram is executed the programs are executed simulatniously. How is this handled if foo is read in continuously.

EDIT:

Forgot to include this:

int main(){
    char buff[255];
    int i = read(0, buff, 255);
    printf("Debug: %s\n", buff);
    return 0;
}

If for instance I execute ls | myprogram I tend to receive.

. ../ files
Debug: 

instead of

Debug: . ../ files
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1  
You're going to want to use the dup2 system call. –  squiguy Nov 20 '12 at 19:42
    
Read also advancedlinuxprogramming.com –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 20 '12 at 19:44
    
Doing a read like that isn't going to guarantee a NUL-terminated string, which is required for your printf to work properly. Also, the read will block until it sees 255 characters - and there won't be any room in the array to put the NUL character. –  prprcupofcoffee Nov 20 '12 at 19:49

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You can do something like this:

FILE* input;
//...
if (argc == 1) {
    input = stdin;
} else {
    input = fopen(argv[2] /* or whatever */, "r");
}
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The second operation is accoplished simply by reading the file. However I am drawing a blank on how to redirect the output from foo into myprogram with a pipe.

When using a pipe redirection, the shell sets up the stdout of the process on the left to go to the stdin of the process on the right. Just read from stdin as you normally would and you're set.

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