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I am trying to write a very simple shell script that will parse a file line by line, and if it finds that the length of the line is 170 characters, then I want it to remove than end of line character so it will merge the next line with it.

I wrote the script but its not working, I know I'm missing something because I keep getting this error: -bash-3.2$ ./removeline.sh '/removeline.sh: line 2: syntax error near unexpected token do '/removeline.sh: line 2:do

for line in `testfile.log`
do
echo ${#line} > $i
if $i = 170 ; then
tr -d '\n'
end
done
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5 Answers 5

So many issues with your code, where to start?
The syntax in bash and ksh is:

while read line
do
    i=${#line}
    if (( $i == 170 ))
    then
        tr -d '\n'
    fi
done < testfile.log

(I have not checked the tr command) However, I still don't think this will achieve your aim.

This is probably nearer the mark:

while read line
do
    i=${#line}
    if (( $i == 170 ))
    then
        echo -n "$line"
    else
        echo "$line"
    fi
done < testfile.log > testfile.new
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1  
The tr command is a pure filter; it reads its standard input, transforms it, and writes to standard output. The usage in the original script is flawed, and you didn't notice this while you were describing some of the other problems. –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '12 at 22:28

tr is the wrong tool here because it doesn't manipulate the line you already read. Well, you could echo "$line" | tr -d '\n' but try this instead:

while read line; do
  n=""
  case $#line in 170 ) n="-n" ;; esac
  echo $n "$line"
done <testfile.log

... assuming echo -n omits the final newline on your system.

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That will add a space in front of the line when length != 170 echo "" "$line" will print " $line" –  glenn jackman Nov 20 '12 at 23:21
    
@glennjackman: doesn't for me, Bash 3.2.39(1). Note that $n is not quoted, precisely for this reason. –  tripleee Nov 21 '12 at 20:48
while read line; do
    (( ${#line} == 170 )) && c="" || c=$'\n'
    printf "%s%s" "$line" "$c"
done < testfile.log
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A little awk might help:

awk '{if (length($0) == 170) printf "%s",$0; else print $0}' < file
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Using perl (portable and proper solution)

$ perl -ne 'chomp; length($_) == 170 ? print : print $_, $/' file.txt
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