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Say if I listen for an event:

Subject.NewEvent += delegate(object sender, NewEventArgs e)
{
    //some code
});

Now how do I un-register this event? Or just allow the memory to leak?

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marked as duplicate by John Saunders, rene, zmo, Blackhole, Mark Rotteveel May 9 at 11:08

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
see here stackoverflow.com/questions/183367/… –  Mikhail Jul 30 '11 at 20:13

7 Answers 7

up vote 18 down vote accepted

If you need to unregister an event, I recommend avoiding anonymous delegates for the event handler.

This is one case where assigning this to a local method is better - you can unsubscribe from the event cleanly.

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I thought so. But, had a doubt. Thanks. –  P.K Aug 28 '09 at 16:41
6  
I disagree - if you need to create a closure then you are going to have to use an anonymous method. –  apiguy Aug 28 '09 at 19:20
3  
@free-dom: There are always options to avoid making closures (worst case, you could do what the compiler does for you). Most of the time, event handlers where you plan to unsubscribe the event are not, IMO, good candidates for events where you want closures. You should be using easily trackable, class level state information instead of having the compiler create the closures for you. Closures in this case tend to lead to strange, difficult to track issues over time, and are not as maintainable. –  Reed Copsey Aug 28 '09 at 20:13
8  
I couldn't disagree with that more. Closures allow you to much more cleanly and succinctly pass in state. Creating little classes and setting state on them is gross and hacky and thus difficult to maintain. –  user24359 May 28 '10 at 6:34
    
Regarding the debate on closures vs methods, I prefer closures by far. The main reason is that I don't want to add fields to a class unless necessary (read: two methods or more need to share variables). Using an additional type to hold the captured values is better, but since that's exactly what the compiler does for me with a closure, I'd rather use the closure. –  Joh Aug 24 '10 at 11:29

Give your instance of the anonymous delegate a name:

EventHandler<NewEventArg> handler = delegate(object sender, NewEventArgs e)
{
    //some code
};

Subject.NewEvent += handler;
Subject.NewEvent -= handler;
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4  
Why is this better than just making it a non-anonymous method? This is much, much less obvious. –  Reed Copsey Aug 28 '09 at 16:42
    
@dtb Don't you think this is very different from what I am asking? –  P.K Aug 28 '09 at 16:43
2  
@PK: I think this is the closest you can get. You cannot unregister something that you cannot refer to. –  dtb Aug 28 '09 at 16:44
7  
@Reed: Anonymous delegates have the added benefit of creating a closure, which you cannot do with a non-anonymous method. If the OP wants to be able to include an in-scope value that can't be passed into the eventargs then this is the best method. –  apiguy Aug 28 '09 at 16:52
1  
This might mean you'd need to create the delegate as a private member, if you're doing the unsubscribe in a different part of the class, so not much of a gain over using a method –  Chris S May 26 '10 at 18:51

To remove the handler on first invocation:

//SubjectType Subject = ..... already defined if using (2)

EventHandler handler = null;
handler = delegate(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    // (1)
    (sender as SubjectType).NewEvent -= handler;
    // or
    // (2) Subject.NewEvent -= handler;

    // do stuff here
};

Subject.NewEvent += handler;
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Using this kind of code, Resharper complains about accessing a modified closure... is this approach reliable? I mean, are we sure that the 'foo' variable inside the body of the anonymous method, really references the anonymous method itself? –  BladeWise Jul 28 '10 at 15:45
    
I think I got the answer myself: Resharper is right, the captured variable ('handler' in the example above) is changed once the anonymous method get assigned to it. So, it does really change, but such mechanism ensures that the 'handler' variable stores a reference to the anonymous method itslef. –  BladeWise Jul 29 '10 at 7:21
    
I've had to do this so the handler could capture state (e.g. the calling method's parameters and locals) and state from the raiser of the event, all because the raiser didn't provide some needed information any other way prior to the calling method exited. It was tortuous, but it worked and didn't require creating an artificial class to handle the event. –  Kit Oct 1 '10 at 16:57
    
Exactly what I need for. Thanks. –  Allender Jan 11 '12 at 17:35

You can create method for unregistering from all listeners of event. This not exactly what you whant, but sometimes it can be helpfull. For example (this really works =)) :

    class Program {
    static void Main(string[] args) {
        A someClass = new A();
        someClass.SomeEvent += delegate(object sender, EventArgs e) {
            throw new NotImplementedException();
        };

        someClass.ClearEventHandlers();
        someClass.FireEvent();

        Console.WriteLine("No error.");
    }

    public class A {
        public event EventHandler SomeEvent;

        public void ClearEventHandlers() {
            Delegate[] delegates = SomeEvent.GetInvocationList();
            foreach (Delegate delegate in delegates) {
                SomeEvent -= (EventHandler) delegate;
            }
        }

        public void FireEvent() {
            if (SomeEvent != null) {
                SomeEvent(null, null);
            }
        }
    }
}
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1  
Not sure why this was voted down -- of course, it's better to not have persistent anonymous methods in the first place, but if you are in a situation where you just need to clean them up, this works really well. –  Guy Starbuck Jul 22 '10 at 20:01

You need a name for your anonymous function, and then, you can only do it as long as the name is in scope:

    var handler = new EventHandler(delegate(object o, EventArgs e)
    {
        //do something...
    };

    Subject.NewEvent += handler;

    // later on while handler is still in scope...

    Subject.NewEvent -= handler;
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Do you need to un-register it for a reason other than leakage?

Regarding the "Or just allow the memory to leak" bit, when Subject is cleaned up by the Garbage Collector, your anonymous delegate should be cleaned up as well, so there shouldn't be a leak.

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Memory leak is one reason and other reason might be that I just want to stop listening to the event –  P.K Aug 28 '09 at 16:40
1  
Then you'd have to store it, as dtb's answer suggests –  Walt W Aug 28 '09 at 16:41
5  
Unfortunately, this can cause a leak. "this" will never get collected as long as "Subject" is still rooted, since the delegate behind Subject.NewEvent will hold a strong reference to "this" until Subject gets unrooted. The WeakEvent pattern exists for this exact reason. –  Reed Copsey Aug 28 '09 at 16:41
    
@Reed: Ah, so if you use "this" in the anonymous delegate, then it creates a circular reference (object <-> delegate) that prevents the garbage collector from cleaning up? Is that what you mean? –  Walt W Aug 28 '09 at 17:06
2  
no, the GC handles circular references well. However if Subject is never GC'ed (maybe it's e.g. the "MainFrame" that lives for the span of the application), then neither will the anonymous delegate, nor the implicit "this" in the delegate. –  nos Sep 20 '10 at 22:58

There is another question (of mine) which goes into this in some (too much) detail: Weak event handler model for use with lambdas.

However, now that the Reactive Framework has come out, I'd seriously consider looking into that in this kind of situation.

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