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I want to build a service that basically pulls data from various API's.

On a typical server, is there a thread limit that one should adhere too?

Does anyone have any experience building something similiar, how many threads was considered ideal and what kind of requests per second can one expect?

Is 100 threads too much? 200?

I realize this is something I'm going to have to test, but looking for someone who has built something similar in nature that can shed some experience on it.

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It's going to take us longer to answer your question than it is for you to test it and tweak the number. The number of threads depends on all sorts of variables which you haven't specified, so any answer is going to be a guess. – Robert Harvey Nov 20 '12 at 20:54
    
Depends entirely on the average response time of the APIs that you're hitting and what blocking activities you may be doing with the result. – Affe Nov 20 '12 at 20:55

It depends on you bottlenecks and your requirements. How fast do you need to complete the operations? Do the threads make IO? I know they make a lot of network requests from your explanation.

So the threads are going to wait on network. Why do you need many threads then, maybe async operations will be faster.

And in general, as Robert Harvey commented: It's going to take us longer to answer your question than it is for you to test it and tweak the number. The number of threads depends on all sorts of variables which you haven't specified, so any answer is going to be a guess

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For your particular case it may be more suited to use an asynchronous style of programming. In this case you could achieve a large throughput of API calls using a small number of threads - it may be even comparable to the number of available cores.

There are several available libraries to achieve this (Twitter is the king here).

And there are many others.

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