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I have tried using Math.Round & MidpointRounding. This does not appear to do what I need.

Example:

52.34567 rounded to 2 decimals UP   = 52.35  
 1.183   rounded to 2 decimals DOWN =  1.18

Do I need to write a custom function?

Edit:

I should have been more specific.

Sometimes I need a number like 23.567 to round DOWN to 23.56. In this scenario...

Math.Round(dec, 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero) gives 23.57
Math.Round(dec, 2, MidpointRounding.ToEven) gives 23.57

Decimals up to 9 decimal places could come out and need to be rounded to 1, 2, 3 or even 4 decimal places.

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1  
What have your tried? –  GameScripting Nov 20 '12 at 21:08
    
Have you tried multiplying by 100, round it, and divide by 100? –  Spoike Nov 20 '12 at 21:09
1  
Can you show the code that you used to do the rounding? –  DJ Burb Nov 20 '12 at 21:10
1  
This appeared to work for me. Maybe I'm misunderstanding the question? Response.Write(Math.Round(52.34567, 2).ToString()); Output: 52.35 –  McArthey Nov 20 '12 at 21:11
1  
Obviously he hasn't tried them, as it does exactly what he needs. He can even test it out himself: Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(52.34567, 2)); and Console.WriteLine(Math.Round(1.183, 2)); –  rossipedia Nov 20 '12 at 21:12
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4 Answers

up vote 13 down vote accepted

Try using decimal.Round():

decimal.Round(x, 2)

Where x is your value and 2 is the number of decimals you wish to keep.

You can also specify whether .5 rounds up or down by passing third parameter:

decimal.Round(x, 2, MidpointRounding.AwayFromZero);

EDIT:

In light of the new requirement (i.e. that numbers are sometimes rounded down despite being greater than "halfway" to the next interval), you can try:

var pow = Math.Pow(10, numDigits);
var truncated = Math.Truncate(x*pow) / pow;

Truncate() lops off the non-integer portion of the decimal. Note that numDigits above should be how many digits you want to KEEP, not the total number of decimals, etc.

Finally, if you want to force a round up (truncation really is a forced round-down), you would just add 1 to the result of the Truncate() call before dividing again.

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Thanks for the info here! Very helpful! –  B-Rad Nov 21 '12 at 13:01
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Assuming you're using the decimal type for your numbers,

static class Rounding
{
    public static decimal RoundUp(decimal number, int places)
    {
        decimal factor = RoundFactor(places);
        number *= factor;
        number = Math.Ceiling(number);
        number /= factor;
        return number;
    }

    public static decimal RoundDown(decimal number, int places)
    {
        decimal factor = RoundFactor(places);
        number *= factor;
        number = Math.Floor(number);
        number /= factor;
        return number;
    }

    internal static decimal RoundFactor(int places)
    {
        decimal factor = 1m;

        if (places < 0)
        {
            places = -places;
            for (int i = 0; i < places; i++)
                factor /= 10m;
        }

        else
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < places; i++)
                factor *= 10m;
        }

        return factor;
    }
}

Example:

Rounding.RoundDown(23.567, 2) prints 23.56
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+1 for not having to convert to double. –  astro boy Mar 11 '13 at 12:00
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Try using Math.Ceiling (up) or Math.Floor (down). e.g Math.Floor(1.8) == 1.

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1  
Those are good function, however, they force the value to a whole number. I need to maintain the decimals in many cases. –  B-Rad Nov 20 '12 at 22:06
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For a shorter answer of the one I selected, here is the RoundUp and RoundDown functions that can be used in C#:

public double RoundDown(double number, int decimalPlaces)
{
    return Math.Floor(number * Math.Pow(10, decimalPlaces)) / Math.Pow(10, decimalPlaces);
}

public double RoundUp(double number, int decimalPlaces)
{
    return Math.Ceiling(number * Math.Pow(10, decimalPlaces)) / Math.Pow(10, decimalPlaces);
}

Again, this is just the short version of the accepted answer.

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