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I need to replace double quotes with single so that something like this

\\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\

becomes

\\servername\dir1\subdir1\

I tried this

string dir = "\\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\";
string s = dir.Replace(@"\\", @"\"); 

The result I get is

\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\

Any ideas?

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2  
Do you see result in dubugger? –  Sergey Berezovskiy Nov 20 '12 at 21:29
    
To get them as literal, you should use the @ symbol. string dir = @"\\servername\dir1\subdir1\"; –  Bob. Nov 20 '12 at 21:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You don't need to replace anything here. The backslashes are escaped, that's why they are doubled.
Just like \t represents a tabulator, \\ represents a single \. You can see the full list of Escape Sequences on MSDN.

string dir = "\\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\";
Console.WriteLine(dir);

This will output \\servername\dir1\subdir1\.

BTW: You can use the verbatim string to make it more readable:

string dir = @"\\servername\dir1\subdir1\";
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thanks! easier than I thought:) –  sarsnake Nov 20 '12 at 22:21

There is no problem with the code for replacing. The result that you get is:

\servername\dir1\subdir1\

When you are looking at the result in the debugger, it's shown as it would be written as a literal string, so a backslash characters is shown as two backslash characters.

The string that you create isn't what you think it is. This code:

string dir = "\\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\";

produces a string containing:

\\servername\dir1\subdir1\

The replacement code does replace the \\ at the beginning of the string.

If you want to produce the string \\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\, you use:

string dir = @"\\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\";

or:

string dir = "\\\\\\\\servername\\\\dir1\\\\subdir1\\\\";
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but why is the result '\\a\\b\\c' not '\\\\a\\b\\c' (allowing for the debugger doubling up all \. The result should not be symetric , there should be different number of \ at the front since we started with more –  pm100 Nov 20 '12 at 21:39
    
@pm100: We start out with double backslashes only at the start of the string, so that's the only ones that gets replaced. –  Guffa Nov 20 '12 at 23:08
    
doh ........... –  pm100 Nov 20 '12 at 23:30

This string "\\\\servername\\dir1\\subdir1\\" is the same as @"\\servername\dir1\subdir1\". In order to escape backslashes you need either use @ symbol before string, or use double backslash instead of one.

Why you need that? Because in C# backslash used for escape sequences.

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