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The great findInterval() function in R uses left-closed sub-intervals in its vec argument, as shown in its docs:

if i <- findInterval(x,v), we have v[i[j]] <= x[j] < v[i[j] + 1]

If I want right-closed sub-intervals, what are my options? The best I've come up with is this:

findInterval.rightClosed <- function(x, vec, ...) {
  fi <- findInterval(x, vec, ...)
  fi - (x==vec[fi])
}

Another one also works:

findInterval.rightClosed2 <- function(x, vec, ...) {
  length(vec) - findInterval(-x, -rev(vec), ...)
}

Here's a little test:

x <- c(3, 6, 7, 7, 29, 37, 52)
vec <- c(2, 5, 6, 35)
findInterval(x, vec)
# [1] 1 3 3 3 3 4 4
findInterval.rightClosed(x, vec)
# [1] 1 2 3 3 3 4 4
findInterval.rightClosed2(x, vec)
# [1] 1 2 3 3 3 4 4

But I'd like to see any other solutions if there's a better one. By "better", I mean "somehow more satisfying" or "doesn't feel like a kludge" or maybe even "more efficient". =)

(Note that there's a rightmost.closed argument to findInterval(), but it's different - it only refers to the final sub-interval and has a different meaning.)

share|improve this question
    
What do you think about: findInterval(x, c(-Inf, head(vec, -1)))? –  sgibb Nov 20 '12 at 22:06
    
@sgibb that doesn't seem to do the trick, I added an example and yours doesn't give the same result. –  Ken Williams Nov 20 '12 at 22:18
    
I'm a bit befuddled here, but does findInterval(x-1,vec) do what you are looking for? –  thelatemail Nov 20 '12 at 22:21
    
@thelatemail, as long as it's just integers? –  BenBarnes Nov 20 '12 at 22:27
    
I think it is ok to post answers to your own question. My vote would go to your findInterval.rightClosed2. –  flodel Nov 20 '12 at 23:40

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

EDIT: Major clean-up in all aisles.

You might look at cut. By default, cut makes left open and right closed intervals, and that can be changed using the appropriate argument (right). To use your example:

x <- c(3, 6, 7, 7, 29, 37, 52)
vec <- c(2, 5, 6, 35)
cutVec <- c(vec, max(x)) # for cut, range of vec should cover all of x

Now create four functions that should do the same thing: Two from the OP, one from Josh O'Brien, and then cut. Two arguments to cut have been changed from default settings: include.lowest = TRUE will create an interval closed on both sides for the smallest (leftmost) interval. labels = FALSE will cause cut to return simply the integer values for the bins instead of creating a factor, which it otherwise does.

findInterval.rightClosed <- function(x, vec, ...) {
  fi <- findInterval(x, vec, ...)
  fi - (x==vec[fi])
}
findInterval.rightClosed2 <- function(x, vec, ...) {
  length(vec) - findInterval(-x, -rev(vec), ...)
}
cutFun <- function(x, vec){
    cut(x, vec, include.lowest = TRUE, labels = FALSE)
}
# The body of fiFun is a contribution by Josh O'Brien that got fed to the ether.
fiFun <- function(x, vec){
    xxFI <- findInterval(x, vec * (1 + .Machine$double.eps))
}

Do all functions return the same result? Yup. (notice the use of cutVec for cutFun)

mapply(identical, list(findInterval.rightClosed(x, vec)),
  list(findInterval.rightClosed2(x, vec), cutFun(x, cutVec), fiFun(x, vec)))
# [1] TRUE TRUE TRUE

Now a more demanding vector to bin:

x <- rpois(2e6, 10)
vec <- c(-Inf, quantile(x, seq(.2, 1, .2)))

Test whether identical (note use of unname)

mapply(identical, list(unname(findInterval.rightClosed(x, vec))),
  list(findInterval.rightClosed2(x, vec), cutFun(x, vec), fiFun(x, vec)))
# [1] TRUE TRUE TRUE

And benchmark:

library(microbenchmark)
microbenchmark(findInterval.rightClosed(x, vec), findInterval.rightClosed2(x, vec),
  cutFun(x, vec), fiFun(x, vec), times = 50)
# Unit: milliseconds
#                                expr       min        lq    median        uq       max
# 1                    cutFun(x, vec)  35.46261  35.63435  35.81233  36.68036  53.52078
# 2                     fiFun(x, vec)  51.30158  51.69391  52.24277  53.69253  67.09433
# 3  findInterval.rightClosed(x, vec) 124.57110 133.99315 142.06567 155.68592 176.43291
# 4 findInterval.rightClosed2(x, vec)  79.81685  82.01025  86.20182  95.65368 108.51624

From this run, cut seems to be the fastest.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I seem to recall that cut is less efficient, and it also doesn't allow trailing off the right edge of vec like findInterval does (see rows 15-17 in your output), but that part could be worked around by adding an Inf at the end. –  Ken Williams Nov 20 '12 at 22:21
    
@KenWilliams, yeah, covering the whole range of x with breaks allows you to cut up all of x (see my edit, too). As to the efficiency, well, the code already exists at least. –  BenBarnes Nov 20 '12 at 22:26
    
@KenWilliams, if you count speed in efficiency benchmarking, there might not be all that much of a difference between findInterval and cut after all. Perhaps the slowdown in cut usually comes from conversion to a factor and label-making? –  BenBarnes Nov 20 '12 at 22:43
    
For completeness, could you include the OP's solutions as well in your timings...? –  joran Nov 20 '12 at 23:15
    
@KenWilliams, if you wish, please see the major update above with (speed) benchmarking. –  BenBarnes Nov 21 '12 at 6:49

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