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Imagine a situation in which there are one king and n number of minions submitted to him. When the king says "One!", one of the minions says "Two!", but only one of them. That is, only the fastest minion speaks while the others must wait for another call of the king.

This is my try:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Program {
    static bool leaderGO = false;

    void Leader() {
        do {
            lock(this) {
                //Console.WriteLine("? {0}", leaderGO);

                if (leaderGO) Monitor.Wait(this);

                Console.WriteLine("> One!");
                Thread.Sleep(200);
                leaderGO = true;

                Monitor.Pulse(this);
            }
        } while(true);
    }

    void Follower (char chant) {
        do {
            lock(this) {
                //Console.WriteLine("! {0}", leaderGO);

                if (!leaderGO) Monitor.Wait(this);

                Console.WriteLine("{0} Two!", chant);
                leaderGO = false;

                Monitor.Pulse(this);
            }
        } while(true);
    }

    static void Main() {
        Console.WriteLine("Go!\n");

        Program m = new Program();

        Thread king = new Thread(() => m.Leader());

        Thread minion1 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('#'));
        Thread minion2 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('$'));

        king.Start();

        minion1.Start();
        minion2.Start();

        Console.ReadKey();
        king.Abort();
        minion1.Abort();
        minion2.Abort();
    }
}

The expected output would be this (# and $ representing the two different minions):

> One!
# Two!
> One!
$ Two!
> One!
$ Two!

...

The order in which they'd appear doesn't matter, it'd be random. The problem, however, is that this code, when compiled, produces this instead:

> One!
# Two!
$ Two!
> One!
# Two!
> One!
$ Two!
# Two!

...

That is, more than one minion speaks at the same time. This would cause quite the tumult with even more minions, and a king shouldn't allow a meddling of this kind.

What would be a possible solution?


For future readers, here's the final, working code:

using System;
using System.Threading;

class Program { 
    static AutoResetEvent leader = new AutoResetEvent(false);
    static AutoResetEvent follower = new AutoResetEvent(false);

    void Leader() {
        do {
            Console.WriteLine("  One!");
            Thread.Sleep(300);

            follower.Set();     // Leader allows a follower speak
            leader.WaitOne();   // Leader waits for the follower to finish speaking
        } while(true);
    }

    void Follower (char emblem) {
        do {
            follower.WaitOne();     // Follower waits for the leader to allow speaking
            Console.WriteLine("{0} Two!", emblem);
            leader.Set();           // Follower finishes speaking
        } while(true);
    }

    static void Main() {
        Console.WriteLine("Go!\n");

        Program m = new Program();

        Thread king = new Thread(() => m.Leader());

        Thread minion1 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('#'));
        Thread minion2 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('$'));
        Thread minion3 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('&'));

        king.Start();

        minion1.Start();
        minion2.Start();
        minion3.Start();

        Console.ReadKey();
        king.Abort();
        minion1.Abort();
        minion2.Abort();
        minion3.Abort();
    }
}
share|improve this question
    
I would recommend using Mutex for handling your criteria section. You can read about it here msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.mutex.aspx –  manman Nov 20 '12 at 22:23
    
Your code just completely doesn't reflect your claimed design intent. Pulsing the monitor wakes all the minions, and then there's nothing to stop them all from printing Two. A start at a fix would be to change if (!leaderGO) Monitor.Wait(this); to while (!leaderGO) Monitor.Wait(this);. –  David Schwartz Nov 20 '12 at 22:26
    
I have edited your title. Please see, "Should questions include “tags” in their titles?", where the consensus is "no, they should not". –  John Saunders Nov 20 '12 at 23:31
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Try using an AutoResetEvent instead of a lock/monitor. It allows you to create a "gate" that only one thread can get through at a time.

Your Follower() threads would call event.WaitOne() (optionally with a timeout). Your Leader() function would call event.Set(), which will release one of the waiting threads.

An AutoResetEvent (as opposed to other types of wait handles) will automatically "close the gate" once of the waiting threads is through.

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.threading.autoresetevent.aspx

share|improve this answer
    
Alright, this seems to be it! However, where exactly would I put each (sorry for the ignorance!)? I mean, should I completely discard the leaderGO bool? Or only the lock and the monitor? Where does AutoResetEvent goes? –  Mutoh Nov 20 '12 at 22:29
    
Nevermind! Figured it out! Thanks –  Mutoh Nov 20 '12 at 22:33
    
Glad to help. FWIW my recommendation for preventing the leader from running again until the follower finishes would be to use a second AutoResetEvent that the leader waits on and the follower sets...but there are probably other ways as well. –  atkretsch Nov 20 '12 at 22:37
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You aren't locking the followers down. So both threads are seeing leaderGo are true, and respond. Have the thread lock itself down before writing out, and that should fix it.

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.Threading;

namespace Threading
{
    class Program
    {
    static bool leaderGO = false;
    static bool followerGo = false;

    void Leader()
    {
        do
        {
            lock (this)
            {
                //Console.WriteLine("? {0}", leaderGO);

                if (leaderGO) Monitor.Wait(this);

                Console.WriteLine("> One!");
                Thread.Sleep(200);
                leaderGO = true;
                followerGo = true;

                Monitor.Pulse(this);
            }
        } while (true);
    }

    void Follower(char chant)
    {
        do
        {
            lock (this)
            {
                //Console.WriteLine("! {0}", leaderGO);

                if (!leaderGO) Monitor.Wait(this);

                if(followerGo)
                {
                    followerGo = false;
                    Console.WriteLine("{0} Two!", chant);
                    leaderGO = false;
                }

                Monitor.Pulse(this);
            }
        } while (true);
    }

    static void Main()
    {
        Console.WriteLine("Go!\n");

        Program m = new Program();

        Thread king = new Thread(() => m.Leader());

        Thread minion1 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('#'));
        Thread minion2 = new Thread(() => m.Follower('$'));

        king.Start();

        minion1.Start();
        minion2.Start();

        Console.ReadKey();
        king.Abort();
        minion1.Abort();
        minion2.Abort();
    }
}

}

share|improve this answer
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What you're experiencing is a race condition. You have two separate threads operating on an unlocked resource (leaderGo), which controls their access to the critical section (printing out "Two!").

Placing a mutex lock (as recommended by manman) on leaderGo before printing out "Two!" is a start. You will also need to check to ensure that the value of leaderGo is still true before printing it, as both threads will eventually acquire the lock, but only one of them will acquire the lock while leaderGo is true.

Something like:

lock(leaderGo)
{
     if (leaderGo)
         Console.WriteLine("{0} Two!", chant);
     leaderGo = false;
}

This will ensure only one follower is capable of responding (since it requires the lock). It will not guarantee which thread obtains the lock, the frequency at which specific threads obtain the lock, or anything like that. However, in each pass every thread will obtain the lock -- all that matters is who was first.

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A few tips:

  • NEVER use lock(this). By locking the object from the inside, anything that uses your object as a locking focus will interfere with your own code's ability to synchronize.
  • NEVER use Thread.Abort(). It is evil; it kills your running threads by injecting an exception, which is unpredictable and thus difficult or impossible to catch and handle gracefully. Instead, try passing an instance of a class with a boolean property IsCancelled, and use !IsCancelled as the condition under which you keep looping.

The actual problem with your code is that your combination of Monitor and locks is causing the lock to be released from within the critical section by the thread that acquires the lock, if that thread thinks someone else must go first. You have three threads, each of which can acquire, then release and wait, before reacquiring the lock and proceeding as if the condition under which it waited was now false.

One possible scenario:

  • Follower 1 enters the critical section (lock() block) of Follower.
  • Follower 2 approaches the critical section of Follower and is told to wait.
  • King approaches the critical section of Leader and is told to wait.
  • Follower 1 sees that leaderGO is false and waits, releasing the lock on the critical section.
  • King, despite being second in line, "races" into the critical section ahead of Follower 2.
  • King continues (leaderGo is false so King never Wait()s), calls "One!" and sets the flag before releasing the lock at the end of the critical section.
  • Follower 2 now "races" into the critical section ahead of Follower 1, sees the flag is set, and continues, calling "Two!" and exiting the critical section.
  • Follower 1 now gets a turn, reacquiring the lock in the middle of its critical section. It no longer cares that leaderGo is false; it's past that check already. So, it continues, also calls "Two!", sets the flag (to the value it had already been) and exits.

There are many possible ways that these threads could "race" based on the way you have it set up.

Here's something that may work a little better; it's called double-checked locking, and while it isn't foolproof it's much better than what you have:

private static readonly object syncObj = new object();

void Leader() {
    do {
        if(leaderGo) 
        {
           Thread.Sleep(200);
           continue;
        }
        lock(syncObj) {
            //the "double-check"; here it's not necessary because there's 
            //only one King to set leaderGo to true, 
            //but it doesn't hurt anything.
            if(leaderGo) continue;

            //we won't get here unless we have control of 
            //the critical section AND must do something.
            Console.WriteLine("> One!");
            Thread.Sleep(200);
            leaderGO = true;
        }
    } while(true);
}

void Follower (char chant) {
    do {
        if(!leaderGo) 
        {
           Thread.Yield();
           continue;
        }
        lock(syncObj) {
            //this double-check is critical;
            //if we were waiting on the other follower to release
            //the lock, they have already shouted out and we must not do so.
            if (!leaderGO) continue;

            //we only get here if we have
            //control of the lock and should shout out
            Console.WriteLine("{0} Two!", chant);
            leaderGO = false;                                
        }
    } while(true);
}

EDIT: As mentioned in the comments, this model doesn't rely on luck, but it isn't foolproof because .NET, for performance, can allow several copies of leaderGO to exist in the caches of various threads, and synchronize them behind the scenes. If .NET isn't johnny-on-the-spot with that synchronization, the double-check performed by one thread may see the old, "stale" state of the flag and incorrectly move on when it should instead get out.

You can fix this one of two simple ways:

  • Put a MemoryBarrier just after any update of leaderGO, and just before any read of leaderGO. Memory barriers, or "memory fences" as they can be called in other languages, basically blocks each running thread at the memory barrier, until all threads are at a memory barrier (or blocked in other ways), ensuring that all instructions occurring before the memory barrier have been executed before any instructions after it are run.
  • Declare leaderGO as volatile. A volatile variable cannot be optimized by .NET; it is guaranteed to be in exactly one location in memory that is accessible, however inefficiently, by any thread that would run that code. Therefore any update to its value is immediately seen by any other thread.
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, I was already aware of this method! But because it even then relies on luck and also forces me to use Sleep (I have only put it in my code for testing), I disconsidered it. But thanks for the tips! –  Mutoh Nov 20 '12 at 22:57
    
It doesn't require sleeping. I only put Sleep() calls in there because you had done so, which I assumed you'd done to slow down execution to watch it work. –  KeithS Nov 20 '12 at 23:07
    
... And it doesn't rely on luck; any Follower that manages to get into the critical section between any other thread shouting "Two!" and the King shouting "One!" just gets right back out without doing anything. It's not foolproof because in this multithreaded implementation, there may be multiple cached copies of leaderGo that are synchronized behind the scenes, and a follower entering a critical section may get a stale copy of the object state. You can fix that by declaring leaderGo as volatile, or by using a MemoryBarrier. –  KeithS Nov 20 '12 at 23:13
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