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This question is merely for me as I always like to write optimized code that can run also on cheap slow servers (or servers with A LOT of traffic)

I looked around and I was not able to find an answer. I was wondering what is faster between those two examples keeping in mind that the array keys in my case is not important (pseudo-code naturally):

<?php
$a = array();
while($new_val = 'get over 100k email addresses already lowercased'){
    if(!in_array($new_val, $a){
        $a[] = $new_val;
        //do other stuff
    }
}
?>

<?php
$a = array();
while($new_val = 'get over 100k email addresses already lowercased'){
    if(!isset($a[$new_val]){
        $a[$new_val] = true;
        //do other stuff
    }
}
?>

As the point of the question is not the array collision, I would like to add that if you are afraid of colliding inserts for $a[$new_value], you can use $a[md5($new_value)]. it can still cause collisions, but would take away from a possible DoS attack when reading from an user provided file (http://nikic.github.com/2011/12/28/Supercolliding-a-PHP-array.html)

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closed as not constructive by mario, Zoltan Toth, Brendan Long, tereško, Brad Werth Nov 21 '12 at 0:45

As it currently stands, this question is not a good fit for our Q&A format. We expect answers to be supported by facts, references, or expertise, but this question will likely solicit debate, arguments, polling, or extended discussion. If you feel that this question can be improved and possibly reopened, visit the help center for guidance.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
If you are always striving to write optimized code, you're surely using a profiler then once in a while? –  mario Nov 20 '12 at 22:21
    
Ummm what is the while for? –  Neal Nov 20 '12 at 22:22
    
I do use profilers and the while is not the core of the question, is merely on the isset Vs in_array. The profiler will give me an answer based on the instance/server/memory avail/cpu avail/ etc... I want to write code that yes keep those things in mind but that is also more portable, mainly, I do want to know what happen in the background –  Fabrizio Nov 20 '12 at 22:23
8  
I vote to reopen. The question is well formed and answers are supported with facts and references. While a micro-optimization, these types of questions are constructive. –  Jason McCreary Nov 21 '12 at 13:41
1  
@JasonMcCreary second; just one more. –  Ja͢ck Nov 22 '12 at 2:15

4 Answers 4

up vote 24 down vote accepted

The answers so far are spot-on. Using isset in this case is faster because

  • It uses an O(1) hash search on the key whereas in_array must check every value until it finds a match.
  • Being an opcode, it has less overhead than calling the in_array built-in function.

These can be demonstrated by using an array with values (10,000 in the test below), forcing in_array to do more searching.

isset:    0.009623
in_array: 1.738441

This builds on Jason's benchmark by filling in some random values and occasionally finding a value that exists in the array. All random, so beware that times will fluctuate.

$a = array();
for ($i = 0; $i < 10000; ++$i) {
    $v = rand(1, 1000000);
    $a[$v] = $v;
}
echo "Size: ", count($a), PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime( true );

for ($i = 0; $i < 10000; ++$i) {
    isset($a[rand(1, 1000000)]);
}

$total_time = microtime( true ) - $start;
echo "Total time: ", number_format($total_time, 6), PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime( true );

for ($i = 0; $i < 10000; ++$i) {
    in_array(rand(1, 1000000), $a);
}

$total_time = microtime( true ) - $start;
echo "Total time: ", number_format($total_time, 6), PHP_EOL;
share|improve this answer
    
I know about hashes, but wondering why something similar is not done on arrays values when possible to speed up functions, it will also reduce memory consuption if similar values are used by simply adding an extra hashing on the value.. correct ? –  Fabrizio Nov 20 '12 at 23:00
2  
@Fabrizio - Array values can be duplicated and contain non-hashable objects. Keys must be unique and can only be strings and integers which makes them easily hashable. While you could create a one-to-one map that hashes both keys and values, this isn't how PHP's array works. –  David Harkness Nov 20 '12 at 23:29
    
+1 Nice addition about the opcode. I hope I got a +1 for my shoulders :) –  Jason McCreary Nov 21 '12 at 4:09
    
@JasonMcCreary You did –  Fabrizio Nov 21 '12 at 16:14

Which is faster: isset() vs in_array()

isset() is faster.

While it should be obvious, isset() only tests a single value. Whereas in_array() will iterate over the entire array, testing the value of each element.

Rough benchmarking is quite easy using microtime().

Results:

Total time isset():    0.002857
Total time in_array(): 0.017103

Note: Results were similar regardless if existed or not.

Code:

<?php
$a = array();
$start = microtime( true );

for ($i = 0; $i < 10000; ++$i) {
    isset($a['key']);
}

$total_time = microtime( true ) - $start;
echo "Total time: ", number_format($total_time, 6), PHP_EOL;

$start = microtime( true );

for ($i = 0; $i < 10000; ++$i) {
    in_array('key', $a);
}

$total_time = microtime( true ) - $start;
echo "Total time: ", number_format($total_time, 6), PHP_EOL;

exit;

Additional Resources

I'd encourage you to also look at:

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Nice solution. I'm surprised more people don't split-time their functions/code more using microtime() or other tools. Incredibly valuable. –  nickhar Nov 20 '12 at 22:32
    
Searching an empty array for the same key only highlights the overhead of calling the in_array function versus using the isset built-in. This would be better with an array containing a bunch of random keys and occasionally searching for an existing key/value. –  David Harkness Nov 20 '12 at 22:35
    
I do use benchmarks and microtime quite a bit, but I also realized, while I was testing while and foreach that at each refresh I was getting different "winners". it always depend on too many server variables, and the best is to iterate a very large number of times on different times and get the one that win more often, or just know what happening in the background and know that it will be the final winner no matter what –  Fabrizio Nov 20 '12 at 22:37
    
@David Harkness, you've already nit-picked my answer. If you want more, stand on my shoulders and post your own answer. :) Nonetheless, if the function overhead is already significantly more expensive relative to isset(), what makes you think passing it a larger array would make it faster? –  Jason McCreary Nov 20 '12 at 22:38
1  
@Fabrizio - Read up on hashing functions and hash tables. –  David Harkness Nov 20 '12 at 22:54

The second would be faster, as it is looking only for that specific array key and does not need to iterate over the entire array until it is found (will look at every array element if it is not found)

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but is also depends of whereabouts of a searched var in global scope –  el Dude Nov 20 '12 at 22:28
    
@EL2002, can you please elaborate on that statement? –  Fabrizio Nov 20 '12 at 22:34
    
Mike, wouldn't be looking at the whole array even with the isset() if it is not found ? –  Fabrizio Nov 20 '12 at 22:46
1  
@Fabrizio No, it doesn't need to iterate. Internally (in C) the PHP array is just a hash table. In order to lookup up a single index value, C just makes a hash of that value and looks up its assigned location in memory. There is either a value there or there isn't. –  Mike Brant Nov 20 '12 at 23:02
1  
@Fabrizio This article provides a good overview of how arrays are internally represented in C by PHP. nikic.github.com/2012/03/28/… –  Mike Brant Nov 20 '12 at 23:04

Using isset() takes advantage of speedier lookup because it uses a hash table, avoiding the need for O(n) searches.

The key is hashed first using the djb hash function to determine the bucket of similarly hashed keys in O(1). The bucket is then searched iteratively until the exact key is found in O(n).

Barring any intentional hash collisions, this approach yields much better performance than in_array().

Note that when using isset() in the way that you've shown, passing the final values to another function requires using array_keys() to create a new array. A memory compromise can be made by storing the data in both the keys and values.

Update

A good way to see how your code design decisions affect runtime performance, you can check out the compiled version of your script:

echo isset($arr[123])

compiled vars:  !0 = $arr
line     # *  op                           fetch      ext  return  operands
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1     0  >   ZEND_ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ              2000000  ~0      !0, 123
         1      ECHO                                                 ~0
         2    > RETURN                                               null

echo in_array(123, $arr)

compiled vars:  !0 = $arr
line     # *  op                           fetch      ext  return  operands
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
   1     0  >   SEND_VAL                                             123
         1      SEND_VAR                                             !0
         2      DO_FCALL                                 2  $0      'in_array'
         3      ECHO                                                 $0
         4    > RETURN                                               null

Not only does in_array() use a relatively inefficient O(n) search, it also needs to be called as a function (DO_FCALL) whereas isset() uses a single opcode (ZEND_ISSET_ISEMPTY_DIM_OBJ) for this.

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