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I am translating C code to another language. I am confused about pointers. Say I have this code. The function foo, calls function bob, and they are both pointers.

double
*foo(double *x, double *init, double *a){
   double *y = (double*)malloc(5*sizeof(double));
   double *z = (double*)malloc(5*sizeof(double));
   double *sum, *update;

   sum = (double*)bob(y, z)    //<---Q1: why y and z don't need stars in front of them? 
                               //I thought they are pointers?

   for (i<0; i<5; i++){
       z[i]=y[i]               //Q2: howcome it's ok to assign y to z? 
   }                           //aren't they pointer?(i.e.hold memory address)
}

double
*bob(*arg1, *arg2){
   something...
}

So,
1) Why y and z don't need stars in front of them, isn't y and z just address?
2) Why sum doesn't have a star, I thought sum is declared as a pointer.
3) Why it's ok to assign y to z?

I've learned these, but they've soooo long, could someone give me a hint?

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The casts are completely pointless. Just say double * sum = bob(x, y);. –  Kerrek SB Nov 20 '12 at 22:27
    
what do you mean by casts? parentheses? –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 22:28
    
@user13985 the (double*)bob thing. bob already returns double* you don't need to cast it. –  Michael Krelin - hacker Nov 20 '12 at 22:30
2  
Your function, double* bob(), isn't a pointer, but rather returns a pointer. (and yeah, the cast is useless) –  Philip Nov 20 '12 at 22:31
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6 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted
double
*foo(double *x, double *init, double *a){
// x is a pointer to a double, init is a pointer to a double, a is a pointer to a double
// foo is a function returning a pointer to a double
//   and taking three pointers to doubles as arguments

   double *y = (double*)malloc(5*sizeof(double));
   // y is a pointer to a double. It is assigned a pointer returned by malloc.
   //   That pointer returned by malloc points to memory space for 5 doubles.

   double *z = (double*)malloc(5*sizeof(double));
   // z is a pointer to a double. It is assigned a pointer returned by malloc.
   //   That pointer returned by malloc points to memory space for 5 doubles.

   double *sum, *update;
   // sum and update are pointers to doubles    

   sum = (double*)bob(y, z)    //<---Q1: why y and z don't need stars in front of them? 
                               //I thought they are pointers?
   // sum (whose type is pointer to double) 
   //   is assigned a pointer to double returned by bob

   for (i<0; i<5; i++){
       y[i] = z[i]       //and are z and y pointers?!?!
       // y[i] === *(y+i)
       // (y + i) points to the i-th element in the space previously allocated by malloc
       // *(y + i) dereferences that pointer
       // equivalently, y[i] accesses the i-th element from an array
   }
   if(sum<0)
   z=y //Q2: howcome it's ok to assign y to z? 
       //aren't they pointer?(i.e.hold memory address)
   // after the assignment, z contains the same address as y (points to the same memory)
}

double
*bob(*arg1, *arg2){
   something...
}
share|improve this answer
    
woww, thanks !! –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 23:34
    
If y is a n by p matrix pointer: y[n][p], what does y[0] do? Does it refer to the first row? –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 23:50
    
Yes, but usually (with some exceptions, e.g. in sizeof()) it evaluates to the address of the first row (and y[1] to the address of the second row, ...). –  ninjalj Nov 21 '12 at 0:45
    
thanks, would you mind show a quick example how y[0] will give the entire row, because mine actually gave the first element of that row. –  user13985 Nov 21 '12 at 1:27
    
int main() { double y[3][4]; printf("%d %d %d\n", sizeof y, sizeof y[0], sizeof y[0][0]); return 0;} –  ninjalj Nov 21 '12 at 2:15
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  1. Values y and z don't need stars because adding a star dereferences them, and you want to pass the pointer not the value.
  2. Again, you want the pointer and not the value. Although from the code it appears you actually DO want the value, so there probably should be a star there.
  3. You can assign a pointer to another pointer, this means change the address that the pointer points to. So when y=z, y now points where z points.
share|improve this answer
    
I see, actually I have y[j]=z[j]. Is that the same thing? –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 22:48
    
@user13985 no, the [] operator dereferences a pointer at some offset. Using *y is the same as using y[0] –  Eric B Nov 21 '12 at 12:18
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  1. They don't need a star because you do not dereference them, but pass as pointers.
  2. You can compare pointer, but that's probably not what you want.
  3. Assigning pointers is okay, note, though, that it's not the same as copying values.
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I messed up asking the question, updated! sorry. –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 22:47
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Ans for Q1: You are passing y and z to another function which take in pointers as arguments, why would you pass the value of the pointer?

Ans2: They are pointers and you are assigning one to another

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by value of the pointers, do you mean address? –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 22:46
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Basic pointer notions:

double a = 42.0;   // a is a double
double b;          // b is a double
double *x;         // x is a pointer to double

x = &a;  // x is the pointer, we store the address of a in pointer x
b = *x;  // *x is the pointee (a double), we store the value pointed by x in b

// now b value is 42.0
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With regard to 2) and why z[i] = y[i] is acceptable, I think it best to point you to this page which describes arrays and pointers in some detail, especially 2.1 through 2.8. What's happening in that particular expression (not necessarily in order) is start at location y, fetch the pointer, add i to the pointer, then fetch the value pointed to at that location. Start at z, fetch the pointer, add i to the pointer, and assign the value (y[i]) to that location.

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I messed up asking the question, updated! sorry. –  user13985 Nov 20 '12 at 22:45
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