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I have a class declared as public class DatumSet : List<datum>, where

public struct datum {
    public UInt32[] chan;
    public UInt64 sample_number;
    public float time;
    public UInt32 source_sector;
}

I want to iterate through the List and make some changes. Why does this NOT work

        for (int i = 0; i < this.Count; i++) {
            this[i].sample_number = startSample;
            this[i].time = (float)startSample / _sample_rate;
            startSample++;
        }

but this DOES work

        for (int i = 0; i < this.Count; i++) {
            datum d = this[i];
            d.sample_number = sampleNumber;
            d.time = (float)sampleNumber / _sample_rate;
            sampleNumber++;
        }

I get the error:

Cannot modify the return value of 'System.Collections.Generic.List.this[int]' because it is not a variable

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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

You're having problems because you are using a struct rather than a class.

When you retrieve a struct from a collection, a copy is made. Your first set of code gives you an error because it detects you're doing something you may not mean to do. You'd actually be editing a copy of the struct rather than the copy in the collection.

The second doesn't produce an error because you explicitly pull the copy out of the collection before editing. This code may compile, but won't modify any of the structs in the collection and thus won't give you the results that you're expecting.

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This is what you get for using a mutable value type :)

Think of an indexer as just like a method call. So this:

this[i].sample_number = startSample;

is like:

GetValue(i).sample_number = startSample;

But because datum is a value type (a struct), the method is returning a copy of the value in the list - so modifying it would do you no good at all.

The compiler is stopping you from making that mistake.

You claim that this works:

for (int i = 0; i < this.Count; i++) {
    datum d = this[i];
    d.sample_number = sampleNumber;
    d.time = (float)sampleNumber / _sample_rate;
    sampleNumber++;
}

... but in reality, it does nothing useful. It's equivalent to:

sampleNumber += this.Count;

That's all. It compiles, but that's not the same as it working.

I would suggest that you make all value types immutable; it helps to prevent you from getting into this mess. So either you can keep datum as a value type, and replace the value in the list on each iteration, or you can change it to be a class, and modify the objects via the reference stored in the list.

(Either way, I'd strongly suggest that you start using properties instead of public fields, and start following .NET naming conventions too.)

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I was just about to comment, "where is Jon Skeet when you need him?" –  Jason Sperske Nov 20 '12 at 22:34
    
Hmm, this is new to me. Structs are mutable and classes are immutable? If I just changed the keyword 'struct' to 'class' would that be sufficient or do i have to add get/set methods too? –  reza Nov 20 '12 at 22:45
2  
@reza: No, structs and classes can both be mutable or immutable - it's up to you. But you really need to understand the differences between structs and classes. See pobox.com/~skeet/csharp/references.html –  Jon Skeet Nov 20 '12 at 22:47
2  
@reza: The first thing to do is not treat C# like C :) They're completely different languages, and you should treat them differently. Ignore the fact that they both use braces and semi-colons, and learn C# from scratch, ideally from a good book. Don't just "look over" a document, tutorial or book - read them thoroughly, assuming that every sentence may contain something you didn't know before. –  Jon Skeet Nov 20 '12 at 23:09
1  
@reza: Yes, that will fix it - but you should do more. You should fix your naming conventions, and you should avoid public fields which are the enemy of encapsulation... and you definitely should make sure you understand exactly why it will fix it, and why the compiler was complaining. Oh, and understand why the code you thought worked really wasn't working. –  Jon Skeet Nov 21 '12 at 6:43
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