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Consider the four percentages below, represented as float numbers:

    13.626332%
    47.989636%
     9.596008%
    28.788024%
   -----------
   100.000000%

I need to represent these percentages as whole numbers. If I simply use Math.round(), I end up with a total of 101%.

14 + 48 + 10 + 29 = 101

If I use parseInt(), I end up with a total of 97%.

13 + 47 + 9 + 28 = 97

What's a good algorithm to represent any number of percentages as whole numbers while still maintaining a total of 100%?


Edit: After reading some of the comments and answers, there are clearly many ways to go about solving this.

In my mind, to remain true to the numbers, the "right" result is the one that minimizes the overall error, defined by how much error rounding would introduce relative to the actual value:

        value  rounded     error               decision
   ----------------------------------------------------
    13.626332       14      2.7%          round up (14)
    47.989636       48      0.0%          round up (48)
     9.596008       10      4.0%    don't round up  (9)
    28.788024       29      2.7%          round up (29)

In case of a tie (3.33, 3.33, 3.33) an arbitrary decision can be made (e.g. 3, 4, 3).

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11  
Suppose you have 3.33, 3.33 and 3.33. Which one will you make 4? –  RobG Nov 20 '12 at 22:49
2  
Exactly. The question embodies a contradiction in terms. –  EJP Nov 20 '12 at 22:50
    
You guys are right of course, but that's part of my challenge. I clearly have to compromise something when removing precision. The question is, what's the most creative way to do that. –  poezn Nov 20 '12 at 22:54
1  
It's a very common scenario in reporting - how to display a "total" of decimal values that doesn't always match the sum of the displayed values. –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 22:56
1  
What is the "right" result in your example case? That may solve the disagreements on what the "best" solution is. –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 23:24

10 Answers 10

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Since none of the answers here seem to solve it properly, here's my semi-obfuscated version using underscorejs:

function foo(l, target) {
    var off = target - _.reduce(l, function(acc, x) { return acc + Math.round(x) }, 0);
    return _.chain(l).
            sortBy(function(x) { return Math.round(x) - x }).
            map(function(x, i) { return Math.round(x) + (off > i) - (i >= (l.length + off)) }).
            value();
}

foo([13.626332, 47.989636, 9.596008, 28.788024], 100) // => [48, 29, 14, 9]
foo([16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666], 100) // => [17, 17, 17, 17, 16, 16]
foo([33.333, 33.333, 33.333], 100) // => [34, 33, 33]
foo([33.3, 33.3, 33.3, 0.1], 100) // => [34, 33, 33, 0]
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2  
Correct me if I am wrong, but isn't this an implementation of the Algorithm proposed by my answer? (Not to clear on underscorejs) –  Varun Vohra Dec 2 '12 at 4:06
    
@VarunVohra sorry i didn't notice this until now, yes it looks like your algorithm is the same :) not sure why my post is the accepted answer, the obfuscated code was just for the lolz... –  yonilevy Mar 31 at 10:40
    
cheers! Learning to do things with node, so the obfuscation is fading ;) –  Varun Vohra Mar 31 at 10:54
1  
@ZacharyBurt what's wrong with that? –  yonilevy Apr 30 at 18:14
    
@yonilevy Deleted my comment; I just didn't realize it was supposed to return a sorted list. I apologize! –  Zachary Burt Apr 30 at 19:08

There are many ways to do just this, provided you are not concerned about reliance on the original decimal data.

The first and perhaps most popular method would be the Largest Remainder Method

Which is basically:

  1. Rounding everything down
  2. Getting the difference in sum and 100
  3. Distributing the difference by adding 1 to items in decreasing order of their decimal parts

In your case, it would go like this:

13.626332%
47.989636%
 9.596008%
28.788024%

If you take the integer parts, you get

13
47
 9
28

which adds up to 97, and you want to add three more. Now, you look at the decimal parts, which are

.626332%
.989636%
.596008%
.788024%

and take the largest ones until the total reaches 100. So you would get:

14
48
 9
29

Alternatively, you can simply chose to show one decimal place instead of integer values. So the numbers would be 48.3 and 23.9 etc. This would drop the variance from 100 by a lot.

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This "Feature Column" on the website of American Mathematical Society – Apportionment II: Apportionment Systems – describes several similar 'apportionment' methods. –  Kenny Evitt Nov 21 '13 at 21:01

DO NOT sum the rounded numbers. You're going to have inaccurate results. The total could be off significantly depending on the number of terms and the distribution of fractional parts.

Display the rounded numbers but sum the actual values. Depending on how you're presenting the numbers, the actual way to do that would vary. That way you get

 14
 48
 10
 29
 __
100

Any way you go you're going to have discrepancy. There's no way in your example to show numbers that add up to 100 without "rounding" one value the wrong way (least error would be changing 9.596 to 9)

EDIT

You need to choose between one of the following:

  1. Accuracy of the items
  2. Accuracy of the sum (if you're summing rounded values)
  3. Consistency between the rounded items and the rounded sum)

Most of the time when dealing with percentages #3 is the best option because it's more obvious when the total equals 101% than when the individual items don't total to 100, and you keep the individual items accurate. "Rounding" 9.596 to 9 is inaccurate in my opinion.

To explain this I sometimes add a footnote that explains that the individual values are rounded and may not total 100% - anyone that understands rounding should be able to understand that explanation.

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That was going to be my suggestion, but I'm a slow typer. –  stannius Nov 20 '12 at 22:55
1  
That't not very helpful since the printed values won't add up to 100. The purpose of the question was to prevent users from thinking the values are incorrect, which in this case, most people would do when looking and comparing to the total. –  Varun Vohra Nov 20 '12 at 23:08
    
@VarunVohra read my edit, you CAN'T display your numbers such that they add up to 100 without "rounding" one by more than 0.5. –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 23:10
1  
@DStanley actually, barring a set where all numbers are shy of 0.5, you can. Check my answer - LRM does exactly that. –  Varun Vohra Nov 20 '12 at 23:15
    
@VarunVohra In the original example LRM will yield 14, 48, 9, and 29 which will "round" 9.596 to 9. If we're allocating based on whole numbers LRM will be the most accurate, but it's still changing one result by more than a half-unit. –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 23:21

Depends on how 'accurate' you need it to be. One option is to simply keep the sum of the rounded numbers and, instead of rounding the last one, simply set it to 100 - that sum. Then it's guaranteed to add up to 100.

That ignores the fact that it would probably make more sense to do that to the 9.59.. number (the one that rounds up but has the smallest fractional part) but, if you start taking that into account, you'll end up with fifty separate rules :-)

Another way which seems more 'accurate' is be to keep a running (non-integral) tally of where you are and round that value. For example, using the values you gave:

Value      CumulValue  CumulRounded  Baseline  Need
---------  ----------  ------------  --------  ----
                                  0
13.626332   13.626332            14         0    14 ( 14 -  0)
47.989636   61.615968            62        14    48 ( 62 - 14)
 9.596008   71.211976            71        62     9 ( 71 - 62)
28.788024  100.000000           100        71    29 (100 - 71)
                                                ---
                                                100

At each stage, you don't round the number itself. Instead you round the accumulated value and work out the best integer that reaches that value from the baseline. The baseline is the cumulative value (rounded) of the previous row.

This works because you're not losing information at each stage but rather using the information more intelligently. The 'correct' rounded values are in the final column and you can see that they sum to 100.

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The problem with that approach is scenarios like when you have to show the sum of 25.5, 25.5, 25.5, and 23.5. You end up with 26, 26, 26, and 22! –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 22:58
4  
Or the sum of 200 values, each of which is 0.5. You get 199 values of 1 and a -99 ;-p The stated goal of making the numbers add to 100 becomes less feasible the more of them there are. –  Steve Jessop Nov 20 '12 at 23:02

You could try keeping track of your error due to rounding, and then rounding against the grain if the accumulated error is greater than the fractional portion of the current number.

13.62 -> 14 (+.38)
47.98 -> 48 (+.02 (+.40 total))
 9.59 -> 10 (+.41 (+.81 total))
28.78 -> 28 (round down because .81 > .78)
------------
        100

Not sure if this would work in general, but it seems to work similar if the order is reversed:

28.78 -> 29 (+.22)
 9.59 ->  9 (-.37; rounded down because .59 > .22)
47.98 -> 48 (-.35)
13.62 -> 14 (+.03)
------------
        100

I'm sure there are edge cases where this might break down, but any approach is going to be at least somewhat arbitrary since you're basically modifying your input data.

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If you are rounding it there is no good way to get it exactly the same in all case.

You can take the decimal part of the N percentages you have (in the example you gave it is 4).

Add the decimal parts. In your example you have total of fractional part = 3.

Ceil the 3 numbers with highest fractions and floor the rest.

(Sorry for the edits)

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1  
While that may provide numbers that add to 100, you may end up turning 3.9 into 3 and 25.1 into 26. –  RobG Nov 20 '12 at 22:47
    
no. 3.9 will be 4 and 25.1 will be 25. i said to ceil the 3 numbers with highest fractions not the highest value. –  arunlalam Nov 20 '12 at 22:49
2  
if there are way too many fractions ending in .9 say 9 values of 9.9% and one value of 10.9 there one value which will end up as 9%, 8 as 10% and one as 11%. –  arunlalam Nov 20 '12 at 22:51

I once wrote an unround tool, to find the minimal perturbation to a set of numbers to match a goal. It was a different problem, but one could in theory use a similar idea here. In this case, we have a set of choices.

Thus for the first element, we can either round it up to 14, or down to 13. The cost (in a binary integer programming sense) of doing so is less for the round up than the round down, because the round down requires we move that value a larger distance. Similarly, we can round each number up or down, so there are a total of 16 choices we must choose from.

  13.626332
  47.989636
   9.596008
+ 28.788024
-----------
 100.000000

I'd normally solve the general problem in MATLAB, here using bintprog, a binary integer programming tool, but there are only a few choices to be tested, so it is easy enough with simple loops to test out each of the 16 alternatives. For example, suppose we were to round this set as:

 Original      Rounded   Absolute error
   13.626           13          0.62633
    47.99           48          0.01036
    9.596           10          0.40399
 + 28.788           29          0.21198
---------------------------------------
  100.000          100          1.25266

The total absolute error made is 1.25266. It can be reduced slightly by the following alternative rounding:

 Original      Rounded   Absolute error
   13.626           14          0.37367
    47.99           48          0.01036
    9.596            9          0.59601
 + 28.788           29          0.21198
---------------------------------------
  100.000          100          1.19202

In fact, this will be the optimal solution in terms of the absolute error. Of course, if there were 20 terms, the search space will be of size 2^20 = 1048576. For 30 or 40 terms, that space will be of significant size. In that case, you would need to use a tool that can efficiently search the space, perhaps using a branch and bound scheme.

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Just for future reference: the "largest remainder" algorithm must minimize the total absolute error according to your metric (See @varunvohra's answer). The proof is simple: suppose it does not minimize the error. Then there must be some set of values which it rounds down which should be rounded up, and vice versa (the two sets are the same size). But every value it rounds down is further from the next integer than any value it rounds up (and v.v.) so the new error amount must be greater. QED. However, it doesn't work for all error metrics; other algorithms are needed. –  rici Nov 21 '12 at 4:04

I think the following will achieve what you are after

function func( orig, target ) {

    var i = orig.length, j = 0, total = 0, change, newVals = [], next, factor1, factor2, len = orig.length, marginOfErrors = [];

    // map original values to new array
    while( i-- ) {
        total += newVals[i] = Math.round( orig[i] );
    }

    change = total < target ? 1 : -1;

    while( total !== target ) {

        // Iterate through values and select the one that once changed will introduce
        // the least margin of error in terms of itself. e.g. Incrementing 10 by 1
        // would mean an error of 10% in relation to the value itself.
        for( i = 0; i < len; i++ ) {

            next = i === len - 1 ? 0 : i + 1;

            factor2 = errorFactor( orig[next], newVals[next] + change );
            factor1 = errorFactor( orig[i], newVals[i] + change );

            if(  factor1 > factor2 ) {
                j = next; 
            }
        }

        newVals[j] += change;
        total += change;
    }


    for( i = 0; i < len; i++ ) { marginOfErrors[i] = newVals[i] && Math.abs( orig[i] - newVals[i] ) / orig[i]; }

    // Math.round() causes some problems as it is difficult to know at the beginning
    // whether numbers should have been rounded up or down to reduce total margin of error. 
    // This section of code increments and decrements values by 1 to find the number
    // combination with least margin of error.
    for( i = 0; i < len; i++ ) {
        for( j = 0; j < len; j++ ) {
            if( j === i ) continue;

            var roundUpFactor = errorFactor( orig[i], newVals[i] + 1)  + errorFactor( orig[j], newVals[j] - 1 );
            var roundDownFactor = errorFactor( orig[i], newVals[i] - 1) + errorFactor( orig[j], newVals[j] + 1 );
            var sumMargin = marginOfErrors[i] + marginOfErrors[j];

            if( roundUpFactor < sumMargin) { 
                newVals[i] = newVals[i] + 1;
                newVals[j] = newVals[j] - 1;
                marginOfErrors[i] = newVals[i] && Math.abs( orig[i] - newVals[i] ) / orig[i];
                marginOfErrors[j] = newVals[j] && Math.abs( orig[j] - newVals[j] ) / orig[j];
            }

            if( roundDownFactor < sumMargin ) { 
                newVals[i] = newVals[i] - 1;
                newVals[j] = newVals[j] + 1;
                marginOfErrors[i] = newVals[i] && Math.abs( orig[i] - newVals[i] ) / orig[i];
                marginOfErrors[j] = newVals[j] && Math.abs( orig[j] - newVals[j] ) / orig[j];
            }

        }
    }

    function errorFactor( oldNum, newNum ) {
        return Math.abs( oldNum - newNum ) / oldNum;
    }

    return newVals;
}


func([16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666], 100); // => [16, 16, 17, 17, 17, 17]
func([33.333, 33.333, 33.333], 100); // => [34, 33, 33]
func([33.3, 33.3, 33.3, 0.1], 100); // => [34, 33, 33, 0] 
func([13.25, 47.25, 11.25, 28.25], 100 ); // => [13, 48, 11, 28]
func( [25.5, 25.5, 25.5, 23.5], 100 ); // => [25, 25, 26, 24]

One last thing, I ran the function using the numbers originally given in the question to compare to the desired output

func([13.626332, 47.989636, 9.596008, 28.788024], 100); // => [48, 29, 13, 10]

This was different to what the question wanted => [ 48, 29, 14, 9]. I couldn't understand this until I looked at the total margin of error

-------------------------------------------------
| original  | question | % diff | mine | % diff |
-------------------------------------------------
| 13.626332 | 14       | 2.74%  | 13   | 4.5%   |
| 47.989636 | 48       | 0.02%  | 48   | 0.02%  |
| 9.596008  | 9        | 6.2%   | 10   | 4.2%   |
| 28.788024 | 29       | 0.7%   | 29   | 0.7%   |
-------------------------------------------------
| Totals    | 100      | 9.66%  | 100  | 9.43%  |
-------------------------------------------------

Essentially, the result from my function actually introduces the least amount of error.

Fiddle here

share|improve this answer
    
that's pretty much what I had in mind, with the difference that the error should be measured relative to the value (rounding 9.8 to 10 is a bigger error than rounding from 19.8 to 20). This could be easily done by reflecting it in the sort callback, though. –  poezn Nov 21 '12 at 1:15
    
this is wrong for [33.33, 33.33, 33.33, 0.1], it returns [1, 33, 33, 33] rather than the more accurate [34, 33, 33, 0] –  yonilevy Nov 21 '12 at 1:54
    
@yonilevy Thanks for that. Fixed now. –  Bruno Nov 21 '12 at 3:03
    
not yet, for [16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666, 16.666] it returns [15, 17, 17, 17, 17, 17] rather than [16, 16, 17, 17, 17, 17] - see my answer –  yonilevy Nov 21 '12 at 3:34

This is a case for banker's rounding, aka 'round half-even'. It is supported by BigDecimal. Its purpose is to ensure that rounding balances out, i.e. doesn't favour either the bank orthe customer.

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3  
It does NOT ensure that rounding balances out - it just reduces the amount of error by distributing half-rounding between even and odd numbers. There are still scenarios where bankers rounding produces inaccurate results. –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 23:08
    
@DStanley Agreed. I didn't say otherwise. I stated its purpose. Very carefully. –  EJP Nov 20 '12 at 23:14
1  
Fair enough - I misinterpreted what you were trying to say. In either case I don't think it solves the problem as using bankers rounding will not change the results in the example. –  D Stanley Nov 20 '12 at 23:19

I'm not sure what level of accuracy you need, but what I would do is simply add 1 the first n numbers, n being the ceil of the total sum of decimals. In this case that is 3, so I would add 1 to the first 3 items and floor the rest. Of course this is not super accurate, some numbers might be rounded up or down when it shouldn't but it works okay and will always result in 100%.

So [ 13.626332, 47.989636, 9.596008, 28.788024 ] would be [14, 48, 10, 28] because Math.ceil(.626332+.989636+.596008+.788024) == 3

function evenRound( arr ) {
  var decimal = -~arr.map(function( a ){ return a % 1 })
    .reduce(function( a,b ){ return a + b }); // Ceil of total sum of decimals
  for ( var i = 0; i < decimal; ++i ) {
    arr[ i ] = ++arr[ i ]; // compensate error by adding 1 the the first n items
  }
  return arr.map(function( a ){ return ~~a }); // floor all other numbers
}

var nums = evenRound( [ 13.626332, 47.989636, 9.596008, 28.788024 ] );
var total = nums.reduce(function( a,b ){ return a + b }); //=> 100

You can always inform users that the numbers are rounded and may not be super-accurate...

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