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I am using dracula for visualizing some graphs. This is a sample html page using dracula:

<html>

    <head>
        <title>
            Testing Dracula
        </title>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/vendor/dracula/raphael-min.js">

        </script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/vendor/dracula/dracula_graph.js">

        </script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/vendor/dracula/dracula_graffle.js">

        </script>
        <script type="text/javascript" src="scripts/vendor/jquery.min.js">

        </script>
    </head>

    <body>
        <div id='canvas'>
        </div>
        <script type="text/javascript">
          var render = function(r, n) {
          var set = r.set().push(
          r.rect(n.point[0] - 30, n.point[1] - 13, 62, 86).attr({
                             "fill": "#fa8",
                             "stroke-width": 2,
                              r: "9px"
          })).push(r.text(n.point[0], n.point[1] + 30, n.label).attr({
                                   "font-size": "14px"
              })); /* custom tooltip attached to the set */
          set.items.forEach(
               function(el) {
                  el.tooltip(r.set().push(r.rect(0, 0, 0, 0).attr({
                                     "fill": "#fec",
                                     "stroke-width": 1,
                                     r: "9px"
                   })))
               });
          return set;
          };

          $(document).ready(function() {
             var width = $(document).width() - 20;
             var height = $(document).height() - 60;
             var g = new Graph();
             var data = {
               "vertices": ["This is some sample long text.", "A", "B", "C", "D\n some More Sample\n Text", "E"],
               "edges": [
                          [
                           0, 1],
                          [
                           0, 2],
                          [
                           0, 3],
                          [
                           2, 4],
                          [
                           3, 4],
                          [
                           4, 5]
                         ]
            };


            addNodes(data.vertices, g);
            addEdges(data.edges, g);

            var layouter = new Graph.Layout.Spring(g);
            layouter.layout(); /* draw the graph using the RaphaelJS draw implementation */
            var renderer = new Graph.Renderer.Raphael('canvas', g, width, height);
                                       renderer.draw();

                               });

            function addNodes(vertices, g) {
                jQuery.each(vertices, function(index, text) {
                g.addNode(index, {
                     label: text,
                     render: render
                             });
                           });
                               }
                 function addEdges(edges, g) {
                 jQuery.each(edges, function(index, arr) {
                 g.addEdge(arr[0], arr[1], {
                      directed: true
                   })
                 });
                               }
        </script>
    </body>

</html>

As you can see in the image below, lengthier text in the node flows outside the bounding box. How can I create node so that its dimensions are large enough to fit the contents within its bounds?

Sample Dracula Graph

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1 Answer 1

You're on the right track here. You can do this in your rendering function. First you add your text element, figure out it's width, use that width when creating the box, then moving the text element to be after the box element. Here's why that fourth step is necessary.

You might modify your code to something like this:

var render = function(r, n) {
    var set = r.set().push(
    var textbit = r.text(n.point[0], n.point[1] + 30, n.label).attr({ "font-size": "14px" });
    var width = $(textbit.node).width() + 10 ;
    textbit.remove();
        r.rect(n.point[0] - Math.round(width / 2), n.point[1] - 13, width, 86).attr({
                     "fill": "#fa8",
                     "stroke-width": 2,
                      r: "9px"
    })).push(r.text(n.point[0], n.point[1] + 30, n.label).attr({
                           "font-size": "14px"
      })); /* custom tooltip attached to the set */
    set.items.forEach(
       function(el) {
          el.tooltip(r.set().push(r.rect(0, 0, 0, 0).attr({
                             "fill": "#fec",
                             "stroke-width": 1,
                             r: "9px"
           })))
       });
    return set;
};

Granted, in this example I'm not actually moving the text element to the back of the DOM, but rather creating a "test" version of the text first just to get the width, then I remove it. Simply moving the element might end up being faster (and perhaps a bit more elegant) but this works

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