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Declaring a class within a class is valid. (Nested classes)

Declaring a namespace within a class is invalid.

The question is: is there any good reason (other than c++ grammar/syntax problems) to forbid the declaration of a namespace within a class ?


As for why would i want to do that, here is an exemple :

Let's have a basic delcaration of a binary tree container

template<typename Data>
class binary_tree
{
 public:
  ... stuff ....     

 private:
  ... iterators class declaration ...

 public:
  typedef left_depth_iterator_impl     left_depth_iterator;
  typedef right_depth_iterator_impl    right_depth_iterator;
  typedef left_breadth_iterator_impl   left_breadth_iterator;
  typedef right_breadth_iterator_impl  right_breadth_iterator;

  ... stuff ....     

 private:
  Data         data;
  binary_tree* left;
  binary_tree* right;
};

Now i notice that there are a lot of iterators in my class, so i would like to regroup them within the same namespace like this :

template<typename Data>
class binary_tree
{
 public:
  ... stuff ....     

 private:
  ... iterators class declaration ...

 public:
  namespace iterator
  {
    typedef left_depth_iterator_impl     left_depth;
    typedef right_depth_iterator_impl    right_depth;
    typedef left_breadth_iterator_impl   left_breadth;
    typedef right_breadth_iterator_impl  right_breadth;
  }

  ... stuff ....     

 private:
  Data         data;
  binary_tree* left;
  binary_tree* right;
};

This would allow a simple usage :

void  function()
{
  binary_tree::iterator::left_depth   it;

  ...stuff...
}

This works if i use a class instead of a namespace, but i am then forced to declare a class that will never be instantiated which is quite a namespace.

Why allow nested classes and forbid nested namespaces within classes ? is it historical ?


Answers with semantic reasons that do not only quote part of the standard(especially syntax parts) will be apreciated :)

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8  
See Eric Lippert's answer at stackoverflow.com/questions/8671427/… Excerpts: Features are unimplemented by default The absence of a feature does not need justification. Rather, all features must be justified by showing that their benefits outweigh their costs. As the person proposing the feature, the onus is on you to describe why you think the feature is valuable; the onus is not on me to explain why it is not. –  Robert Cooper Nov 21 '12 at 0:19
    
The answer linked by Robert is a very good read, I wish I could up-vote it a few more times. –  WhozCraig Nov 21 '12 at 0:39
    
you can do... #define inclass_namespace struct.. and you can use it like that... –  neagoegab Mar 8 '13 at 9:34

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

There's no real advantage to adding such a feature to the language. Features generally don't get added unless there's demand.

What would namespaces inside classes buy you? Would you really rather say binary_tree::iterator::left_depth instead of simply binary_tree::left_depth? Perhaps if you had multiple namespaces inside, you use them to distinguish say binary_tree::depth_iterator::left and binary_tree::breadth_iterator::right.

In any event, you can achieve the desired result use internal classes as a poor-man's namespace, which is even more reason why there isn't demand for true namespaces inside classes.

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6  
"Features generally don't get added unless there's demand." We are talking about C++, right? –  Brian Gordon Feb 10 at 21:33

I stumbled on this question because I was looking for the exact same thing in c#. Not being able to use namespaces to segregate code is a disappointment and it increases code disorder and confusion. Having structured ways to subdivide code into logical units is always preferable to a pile of spaghetti within a class. Nesting classes together is much more tedious because it forces one to do a bunch of maintenance work building a hierarchy of inner classes and then making them aware of each other along with a bunch of tedious boilerplate repeated ad nauseum (or forcing the use of code generators or domain specific langs).

I also do not buy the comment about not having to justify the absence of features. The language architects chose to take the general concept of namespaces and narrow the scope unnecessarily. Language designers often underestimate the disorder these seemingly minor concessions create. The more structured code organization features are available, the better. In my books, creating an optional feature and having it be seldom used, is preferable to precluding it, especially in cases such as these where it's more semantic and less compiler-driven.

I think namespaces within classes make perfect sense and many languages would have benefited from them.

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Since you asked which parts of the standard mandate namespace location, we hit that up first:

C++11 7.3-p4: Every namespace-definition shall appear in the global scope or in a namespace scope (3.3.6).

Regarding class definitions and the proposition of declaring a namespace within, I bring you to...

C++11 9.2-p2: A class is considered a completely-defined object type (3.9) (or complete type) at the closing } of the class-specifier. Within the class member-specification, the class is regarded as complete within function bodies, default arguments, exception-specifications, and brace-or-equal-initializers for non-static data members (including such things in nested classes). Otherwise it is regarded as incomplete within its own class member-specification.

Ergo, a class definition is finite once the closing curly is reached. It cannot be opened back up and extended (derivation is something different, but it is NOT extending the class just defined).

But lurking at the very beginning of the standard definition of a namespace is the ability to extend it; to expand it for lack of a better term:

C++ 7.3-p1: A namespace is an optionally-named declarative region. The name of a namespace can be used to access entities declared in that namespace; that is, the members of the namespace. Unlike other declarative regions, the definition of a namespace can be split over several parts of one or more translation units. (emphasis added).

Therefore, a namespace within a class would violate the definition in 7.3-p4. Assuming that was not present, it would be possible to declare a namespace anywhere, including in a class, but since the definition of a class is formalized once it is closed, you would be left with only the ability to do the following if you maintained compliance with 7.3-p1:

class Foo
{
   namespace bar
   {
       ..stuff..
   }

   .. more stuff ..

   namespace bar
   {
       ..still more stuff..
   }
};

The usefulness of this feature was likely debated for about 3-full-seconds before 7.3-p4 was established to settle it.

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This is just not the point of namespaces. Namespaces are meant to exist closer to the top level of code so that if two different companies (or code bases) can mix code with each other. At a more micro level, I code with both IMAP for email access and SMTP for email sending and (could, I am simplifying greatly) have classes in either module called Email that are quite different, but I could have an application, say a mail client, that wants to use both from the same class, e.g. perhaps it forwards mails from one account to another. Namespaces / package names / etc. permit this.

What you have proposed simply isn't what namespaces are for - within one file you are able to give things different names since the author has global knowledge of the file, although this isn't true when two companies want to share code or two applications that didn't know they would be colliding at any point.

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