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What are the upper and lower limits of pixel values in OpenCV and how can I get them?

The only limits I could figure out are CV_8U type Mat's, where the lower limit for pixel values in a channel is 0, the upper is 255. What are these values for other Mat's?

Say CV_32F, CV_32S?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

OpenCV Equivalent C/C++ data types:

CV_8U -> unsigned char (min = 0, max = 255)

CV_8S -> char (min = -128, max = 127)

CV_16U -> unsigned short (min = 0, max = 65535)

CV_16S -> short (min = -32768, max = 32767)

CV_32S -> int (min = -2147483648, max = 2147483647)

CV_32F -> float

CV_64F -> double

Check this tutorial for data type ranges.

One thing to consider is that while displaying images of type CV_32F or CV_64F with imshow or cvShowImage, OpenCV expects values to be normalized between 0.0 and 1.0. Else, it saturates the pixel values.

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Thank you! I'll test these all. –  Barnabas Szabolcs Nov 22 '12 at 15:43
    
Thank you! This should be on the front page of the OpenCV documentation –  Mirror318 Sep 9 '13 at 22:29
    
It would be nice if cv::Mat had a function to query this information –  Tim MB Jan 13 '14 at 10:43
    
Are there any constants defined for these maximum values in the cv namespace? –  leinaD_natipaC Nov 18 '14 at 15:23

CV_32F means a 32 bit floating point number. CV_32S means a 32 bit signed integer. I'm sure you can guess what CV_64F stands for. The internet is full of references for the ranges that different data types can take on, here is 32S for instance.

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That far I have already got. But does OpenCV use the whole range? Meaning numeric_limits<float>::max() will be white and numeric_limits<float>::min() will be black for a CV_32FC1? –  Barnabas Szabolcs Nov 21 '12 at 0:58
2  
for CV_32F, 0.0 is black and 1.0 is white. –  sgarizvi Nov 21 '12 at 13:05

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