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When building a link that has the sole purpose to run JavaScript code, there are two ways to write the code. Which of the following is better, in terms of functionality, page load speed, validation purposes, etc.?

<a href="#" onclick="myJsFunc();">Run JavaScript Code</a>

or

<a href="javascript:void(0)" onclick="myJsFunc();">Run JavaScript Code</a>
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This question has an open bounty worth +50 reputation from Azzie Rogers ending in 6 days.

One or more of the answers is exemplary and worthy of an additional bounty.

6  
@TomášFejfar What you say has certain validity (and can make markup smaller), but do note that it adds to the javascript size, execution time, and sometimes it's just harder than adding an onclick=. Using jQuery for example might look "lightweight" for its size ($('#foo').click(doSomething);), but the amount of work and function calls that this causes is immense. –  Camilo Martin May 27 '13 at 0:25
40  
Unless I'm missing something, <a href="javascript:void(0)" onclick="myJsFunc();"> makes absolutely no sense. If you must use the javascript: psuedo-protocol, you don't need the onclick attribute as well. <a href="javascript:myJsFunc();"> will do just fine. –  Wesley Murch Jun 2 '13 at 17:41
17  
@WesleyMurch - If myJsFunc() has a return value, your page will break. jsfiddle.net/jAd9G You'd still have to use void like so: <a href="javascript:void myJsFunc();">. But then, the behavior would still differ. Invoking the link via context menu does not trigger the click event. –  gilly3 Jul 31 '13 at 0:24
7  
Why not just <a href="javascript:;" onclick="myEvent()"? –  3k- Nov 20 '13 at 12:12
5  
javascript:; is a lot quicker to type than javascript:void(0) –  Mike Causer Dec 12 '13 at 12:26

45 Answers 45

When I've got several faux-links, I prefer to give them a class of 'no-link'.

Then in jQuery, I add the following code:

$(function(){
   $('.no-link').click(function(e){
       e.preventDefault();
   });
});

And for the HTML, the link is simply

<a href="/" class="no-link">Faux-Link</a>

I don't like using Hash-Tags unless they're used for anchors, and I only do the above when I've got more than two faux-links, otherwise I go with javascript:void(0).

<a href="javascript:void(0)" class="no-link">Faux-Link</a>

Typically, I like to just avoid using a link at all and just wrap something around in a span and use that as a way to active some JavaScript code, like a pop-up or a content-reveal.

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You could use the href and remove all links that have only hashes:

HTML:

<a href="#" onclick="run_foo()"> foo </a>

JS:

$(document).ready(function(){         // on DOM ready or some other event

   $('a[href=#]').attr('href','');    // set all reference handles to blank strings
                                      //  for anchors that have only hashes

});
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If you use a link as a way to just execute some JavaScript code (instead of using a span like D4V360 greatly suggested), just do:

<a href="javascript:(function()%7Balert(%22test%22)%3B%7D)()%3B">test</a>

If you're using a link with onclick for navigation, don't use href="#" as the fallback when JavaScript is off. It's usually very annoying when the user clicks on the link. Instead, provide the same link the onclick handler would provide if possible. If you can't do that, skip the onclick and just use a JavaScript URI in the href.

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1  
@mplungjan If JS is off, clicking it will do nothing, which makes sense if there's no non-js alternative representation/action of what the JS is doing. Having the href be "#" or some URI isn't any more useful, in the case I was describing. –  Shadow2531 Jan 15 '12 at 6:07

I choose use javascript:void(0), because use this could prevent right click to open the content menu.

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I strongly prefer to keep my JavaScript out of my HTML markup as much as possible. If I'm using <a> as click event handlers then I'd recommend using <a class="trigger" href="#">Click me!</a>.

$('.trigger').click(function (e) {
    e.preventDefault();
    // Do stuff...
});

It's very important to note that many developers out there believe that using anchor tags for click-event handlers isn't good. They'd prefer you to use a <span> or <div> with some CSS that adds cursor: pointer; to it. This is a matter if much debate.

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Just to pick up the point some of the other have mentioned.

It's much better to bind the event 'onload'a or $('document').ready{}; then to put JavaScript directly into the click event.

In the case that JavaScript isn't available, I would use a href to the current URL, and perhaps an anchor to the position of the link. The page is still be usable for the people without JavaScript those who have won't notice any difference.

As I have it to hand, here is some jQuery which might help:

var [functionName] = function() {
};

jQuery("[link id or other selector]").bind("click", [functionName]);
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I use href="#" for links that I want a dummy behaviour for. Then I use this code:

$(document).ready(function() {
    $("a[href='#']").click(function(event) {
        event.preventDefault();
    });
});

Meaning if the href equals to a hash (*="#") it prevents the default link behaviour, thus still allowing you to write functionality for it, and it doesn't affect anchor clicks.

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Don't lose sight of the fact that your URL may be necessary -- onclick is fired before the reference is followed, so sometimes you will need to process something clientside before navigating off the page.

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You should not use inline onclick="something();" in your HTML to not polluate it with meaningless code; all click bindings must be set in Javascript files (*.js).

Set binding like this : $('#myAnchor').click(function(){... **return false**;}); or $('#myAnchor').bind('click', function(){... **return false**;});

Then you have a clean HTML file easy to load (and seo friendly) without thousands of href="javascript:void(0);" and just href="#"

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2  
Assuming you're using JQuery, but point taken. –  Lankymart Jul 18 '13 at 11:50
2  
I feel like a dinosaur, but as the maintainer of an extremely large project (>5M lines of code), I couldn't disagree more. I am so sick and tired of having to do a global search on the ID of a tag to find out what happens when it's clicked. I suppose I could blame the original designers, but I've come to the conclusion that a web page with unobtrusive JavaScript is like trying to read a newspaper article with the nouns on one page and the verbs on another. Clean, pure, separated, you won't get any argument from me. Maintainable... that's quite another story. Sorry to rant... –  Jim Stanley Dec 11 '13 at 0:25

I'd say the best way is to make an href anchor to an ID you'd never use, like #Do1Not2Use3This4Id5 or a similar ID, that you are 100% sure no one will use and won't offend people.

  1. Javascript:void(0) is a bad idea and violates Content Security Policy on CSP-enabled HTTPS pages https://developer.mozilla.org/en/docs/Security/CSP (thanks to @jakub.g)
  2. Using just # will have the user jump back to the top when pressed
  3. Won't ruin the page if JavaScript isn't enabled (unless you have JavaScript detecting code
  4. If JavaScript is enabled you can disable the default event
  5. You have to use href unless you know how to prevent your browser from selecting some text, (don't know if using 4 will remove the thing that stops the browser from selecting text)

Basically no one mentioned 5 in this article which I think is important as your site comes off as unprofessional if it suddenly starts selecting things around the link.

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I personally use them in combination. For example:

HTML

<a href="#">Link</a>

with little bit of jQuery

$('a[href="#"]').attr('href','javascript:void(0);');

or

$('a[href="#"]').click(function(e) {
   e.preventDefault();
});

But I'm using that just for preventing the page jumping to the top when the user clicks on an empty anchor. I'm rarely using onClick and other on events directly in HTML.

My suggestion would be to use <span> element with the class attribute instead of an anchor. For example:

<span class="link">Link</span>

Then assign the function to .link with a script wrapped in the body and just before the </body> tag or in an external JavaScript document.

<script>
    (function($) {
        $('.link').click(function() {
            ... code to execute ...
        });
    })(jQuery);
</script>

*Note: For dynamically created elements, use:

$('.link').on('click', function() {
    ... code to execute ...
});

And for dynamically created elements which are created with dynamically created elements, use:

$(document).on('click','.link', function() {
    ... code to execute ...
});

Then you can style the span element to look like an anchor with a little CSS:

.link {
    color: #0000ee;
    text-decoration: underline;
    cursor: pointer;
}
.link:active {
    color: red;
}

Here's a jsFiddle example of above aforementioned.

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I believe you are presenting a false dichotomy. These are not the only two options.

I agree with Mr. D4V360 who suggested that, even though you are using the anchor tag, you do not truly have an anchor here. All you have is a special section of a document that should behave slightly different. A tag is far more appropriate.

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If you are using an <a> element, just use this:

<a href="javascript:myJSFunc();" />myLink</a>

Personally I'd attach an event handler with JavaScript later on instead (using attachEvent or addEventListener or maybe <put your favorite JavaScript framework here > also).

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7  
Can someone explain the reason why this answer has so many downvotes? –  Timo Huovinen May 16 '12 at 19:36
1  
This answer has man downvotes because (as noted in the other response) putting javascript in the actual tag is considered very bad practice. Click handlers should never be in the HTML itself. The top answer best explains this in detail. –  David Granado Mar 15 '13 at 14:31

Here is one more option for completeness sake, that prevents the link from doing anything even if JavaScript is disabled, and it's short :)

<a href="#void" onclick="myJsFunc()">Run JavaScript function</a>

If the id is not present on the page, then the link will do nothing.

Generally, I agree with the Aaron Wagner's answer, the JavaScript link should be injected with JavaScript code into the document.

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3  
In HTML5, most of the restrictions on IDs are lifted, so they can start with a number. The only restrictions now are that they must be unique and cannot contain spaces. See whatwg.org/specs/web-apps/current-work/multipage/…. Also, your solution modifies the URL and inserts a history entry, polluting the back button with useless states. –  Andy E May 16 '12 at 13:07
2  
@AndyE yep, your right, I wasn't aware that id's could start with numbers, also this solution was never meant to be any good or recommended, I added it for "completeness sake" on the number of ways to do it. –  Timo Huovinen May 16 '12 at 13:16

Why not using this? This doesn't scroll page up.

<span role="button" onclick="myJsFunc();">Run JavaScript Code</span>
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protected by Yi Jiang Nov 9 '11 at 15:49

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