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I have the following:

read -p 'Delete old symlinks? y/n: ' prompt

if [ $prompt == [yY] ]
then    
    current_dir=$(pwd)
    script_dir=$(dirname $0)

    if [ $script_dir = '.' ]
    then
        script_dir="$current_dir"
    fi

    for sym in {find $PATH -type l -xtype d -lname "~"}
    do
        rm $sym
        echo "Removed: $sym"
    done
fi

What I'm trying to achieve is the following:

  • If prompt equals y (yes) Then: Find all the symlinks in ~ (home directory) and do a for loop on them which would delete them and output which one it deleted.

Although right now it doesn't do the deleting part, the rest works fine. I didn't include the part that works, it's just a bunch of ln -s.

I am in Mac OS X Mountain Lion (10.8.2), using Zsh as shell, this goes in a .sh file.

The problem I am having is that nothing happens, and so it just says:

ln: /Users/eduan/.vim/vim: File exists
ln: /Users/eduan/.vimrc: File exists
ln: /Users/eduan/.gvimrc: File exists
Done...

etc.

Many thanks for any help you can provide!

EDIT:
I now have the following:

read -p 'Delete old symlinks? y/n: ' prompt

if [ $prompt == [yY] ]
then    
   find ~ -type l | while read line
   do
      rm -v "$line"
   done
fi
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3 Answers 3

find /path -type l | xargs rm

The first part lists the symlinks. Xargs says for each of the returned values issue an rm

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I think it's find instead of Find. I will try it now. :) –  Greduan Nov 21 '12 at 1:17
    
Yup! You're right. Darn auto caps! :) –  cowboydan Nov 21 '12 at 1:21
    
Same problem though... It keeps telling me that the symlinks already exist, that's the error I keep coming to. :/ –  Greduan Nov 21 '12 at 2:03
    
I've been trying other simpler methods and stuff and I am not able to solve it. :/ –  Greduan Nov 21 '12 at 3:01
2  
you could also find /path -type l -delete, for completeness sake. –  jeremiahd Nov 21 '12 at 10:45

How about this?

find ~ -type l | while read line
do
   rm -v "$line"
done
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I tried it, replacing all of the for loop, but it didn't work, same problem, doesn't do anything. –  Greduan Nov 21 '12 at 1:15
    
What exactly does rm --verbose "$line" output? –  nicolai.rostov Nov 21 '12 at 1:24
    
I updated question with what my problem is. Also, it doesn't output anything... –  Greduan Nov 21 '12 at 1:27
    
I've been trying other simpler methods and stuff and I am not able to solve it. :/ –  Greduan Nov 21 '12 at 3:02
up vote -1 down vote accepted

I was able to solve the problem, turns out it was the if conditional that wasn't working. Thanks for your help anyway guys! :)

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