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I need to make a shared memory segment so that I can have multiple readers and writers access it. I think I know what I am doing as far as the semaphores and readers and writers go...

BUT I am clueless as to how to even create a shared memory segment. I want the segment to hold an array of 20 structs. Each struct will hold a first name, an int, and another int.

Can anyone help me at least start this? I am desperate and everything I read online just confuses me more.

EDIT: Okay, so I do something like this to start

int memID = shmget(IPC_PRIVATE, sizeof(startData[0])*20, IPC_CREAT);

with startData as the array of structs holding my data initialized and I get an error saying "Segmentation Fault (core dumped)"

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man shmget and shmat –  Greg Hewgill Nov 21 '12 at 1:54
    
On calling shmget or later? Did you check whether the call to shmget returned an error (if it did, then memID will be -1 and you can print the error with perror). –  William Morris Nov 21 '12 at 2:33
1  
I suggest you begin by copying an existing example and changing it as you need. support.sas.com/documentation/onlinedoc/sasc/doc750/html/lr2/… –  imreal Nov 21 '12 at 2:34
1  
+1 Nick. Ironically, isn't that just about story of our engineering lives =P –  WhozCraig Nov 21 '12 at 2:38
    
@Nick When I run that code it will not even compile for me. I get "test.c: In function main': test.c:51: error: S_IRUSR' undeclared (first use in this function) test.c:51: error: (Each undeclared identifier is reported only once test.c:51: error: for each function it appears in.) test.c:51: error: S_IWUSR' undeclared (first use in this function) test.c:51: error: S_IRGRP' undeclared (first use in this function) test.c:51: error: S_IWGRP' undeclared (first use in this function) test.c:51: error: S_IROTH' undeclared (first use in this function) test.c:51: error: `S_IWOTH' ... –  Michael Staudt Nov 21 '12 at 3:36

1 Answer 1

The modern way to obtain shared memory is to use the API, provided by the Single UNIX Specification. Here is an example with two processes - one creates a shared memory object and puts some data inside, the other one reads it.

First process:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define SHM_NAME "/test"

typedef struct
{
   int item;
} DataItem;

int main (void)
{
   int smfd, i;
   DataItem *smarr;
   size_t size = 20*sizeof(DataItem);

   // Create a shared memory object
   smfd = shm_open(SHM_NAME, O_RDWR | O_CREAT, 0600);
   // Resize to fit
   ftruncate(smfd, size);
   // Map the object
   smarr = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE, MAP_SHARED, smfd, 0);

   // Put in some data
   for (i = 0; i < 20; i++)
      smarr[i].item = i;

   printf("Press Enter to remove the shared memory object\n");
   getc(stdin);

   // Unmap the object
   munmap(smarr, size);
   // Close the shared memory object handle
   close(smfd);
   // Remove the shared memory object
   shm_unlink(SHM_NAME);

   return 0;
}

The process creates a shared memory object with shm_open(). The object is created with an initial size of zero, so it is enlarged using ftruncate(). Then the object is memory mapped into the virtual address space of the process using mmap(). The important thing here is that the mapping is read/write (PROT_READ | PROT_WRITE) and it is shared (MAP_SHARED). Once the mapping is done, it can be accessed as a regular dynamically allocated memory (as a matter of fact, malloc() in glibc on Linux uses anonymous memory mappings for larger allocations). Then the process writes data into the array and waits until Enter is pressed. Then it unmaps the object using munmap(), closes its file handle and unlinks the object with shm_unlink().

Second process:

#include <stdio.h>
#include <sys/mman.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

#define SHM_NAME "/test"

typedef struct
{
   int item;
} DataItem;

int main (void)
{
   int smfd, i;
   DataItem *smarr;
   size_t size = 20*sizeof(DataItem);

   // Open the shared memory object
   smfd = shm_open(SHM_NAME, O_RDONLY, 0600);
   // Map the object
   smarr = mmap(NULL, size, PROT_READ, MAP_SHARED, smfd, 0);

   // Read the data
   for (i = 0; i < 20; i++)
      printf("Item %d is %d\n", i, smarr[i].item);

   // Unmap the object
   munmap(smarr, size);
   // Close the shared memory object handle
   close(smfd);

   return 0;
}

This one opens the shared memory object for read access only and also memory maps it for read access only. Any attempt to write to the elements of the smarr array would result in segmentation fault being delivered.

Compile and run the first process. Then in a separate console run the second process and observe the output. When the second process has finished, go back to the first one and press Enter to clean up the shared memory block.

For more information consult the man pages of each function or the memory management portion of the SUS (it's better to consult the man pages as they document the system-specific behaviour of these functions).

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