Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a map which either changes a value or sets it to nil. I then want to remove the nil entries from the list. The list doesn't need to be kept.

This is what I currently have:

items.map! { |x| process_x url } # [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] => [1, nil, 3, nil, nil]
items.select! { |x| !x.nil? } # [1, nil, 3, nil, nil] => [1, 3]

I'm aware I could just do a loop and conditionally collect in another array like this:

new_items = []
items.each do |x|
    x = process_x x
    new_items.append(x) unless x.nil?
end
items = new_items

But it doesn't seem that ruby-esque. Is there a nice way to run a function over a list removing/excluding the nils as you go?

share|improve this question

4 Answers 4

up vote 221 down vote accepted

Why not use compact?

[1, nil, 3, nil, nil].compact
=> [1, 3] 

I'd like to remind people that if you're getting an array containing nils as the output of a map block, and that block tries to conditionally return values, then you've got code smell and need to rethink your logic.

For instance, if you're doing something that does this:

[1,2,3].map{ |i|
  if i % 2 == 0
    i
  end
}
# => [nil, 2, nil]

Then don't. Instead, prior to the map, reject the stuff you don't want or select what you do want:

[1,2,3].select{ |i| i % 2 == 0 }.map{ |i|
  i
}
# => [2]

I consider using compact to clean up a mess as a last-ditch effort to get rid of things we didn't handle correctly, usually because we didn't know what was coming at us. We should always know what sort of data is being thrown around in our program; Unexpected/unknown data is bad. Anytime I see nils in an array I'm working on, I dig into why they exist, and see if I can improve the code generating the array, rather than allow Ruby to waste time and memory generating nils then sifting through the array to remove them later.

'Just my $%0.2f.' % [2.to_f/100]
share|improve this answer
2  
Doh! Thanks, just having a late-night moment... –  Peter Hamilton Nov 21 '12 at 2:32
9  
Now that's ruby-esque! –  Christophe Marois May 16 '13 at 20:56
    
Note: Doesn't filter out "" –  FloatingRock Aug 14 at 8:21
1  
Why should it? The OP needs to strip nil entries, not empty strings. BTW, nil isn't the same as an empty-string. –  the Tin Man Aug 14 at 19:31

In your example

items.map! { |x| process_x url } # [1, 2, 3, 4, 5] => [1, nil, 3, nil, nil]

it does not look like the values have changed other than being replaced with nil. If that is the case, then

items.select{ |x| process_x url }

will suffice.

share|improve this answer

@the Tin Man, nice - I din't know this method. Well, definitely compact is the best way, but still can be also done with simple substraction:

[1, nil, 3, nil, nil] - [nil]
 => [1, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, set subtraction will work, but it's about half as fast due to its overhead. –  the Tin Man Jan 16 at 18:44

If you wanted a looser criterion for rejection, for example, to reject empty strings as well as nil, you could use:

[1, nil, 3, 0, ''].reject(&:blank?)
 => [1, 3, 0] 

If you wanted to go further and reject zero values (or apply more complex logic to the process), you could pass a block to reject:

[1, nil, 3, 0, ''].reject do |value| value.blank? || value==0 end
 => [1, 3]

[1, nil, 3, 0, '', 1000].reject do |value| value.blank? || value==0 || value>10 end
 => [1, 3]
share|improve this answer
    
.blank? is only available in rails. –  ewalk Sep 18 at 21:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.