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I wrote a c++ program, but it would crash when executing. This is my code:

int main()
{
    int jack_count = 0;
    double* jack_data = get_from_jack(&jack_count);
    vector<double>* jill_data = get_from_jill();

    double* jack_high = high(jack_data, jack_data+jack_count);
    vector<double>& v = *jill_data;
    double* jill_high = high(&v[0], &v[0]+v.size());

    cout << "jack's high is " << *jack_high << "\njill's high is " << *jill_high << endl;

    delete[] jack_data;
    delete jill_data;
    return 0;
}

The function get_from_jack and get_from_jill get data from user and the function high search for the largest value in the data. The program would print correct answer and then crash. If I delete delete[] jack_data; delete jill_data; it works well. If I delete this code, would there be memory leak? Why this code would crash?

This is my get_from_jack() and get_from_jill():

double* get_from_jack(int* count)
{
    double* jacks_data = new double[100];
    double n;
    int i=0;
    while(true){
        cout << "Jack: enter data, -1 to end: " << endl;
        cin >> n;
        if(n == -1) break;
        jacks_data[i] = n;
        ++i;
    }
    *count = i;
    return jacks_data;
}

vector<double>* get_from_jill()
{   
    vector<double> jills_data;
    double n;
    while(true){
        cout << "Jill: enter data, -1 to end: " << endl;
        cin >> n;
        if(n == -1) break;
        jills_data.push_back(n);
    }
    return &jills_data;
}
share|improve this question

closed as too localized by WhozCraig, Öö Tiib, Mysticial, Justin Satyr, kiamlaluno Nov 22 '12 at 2:37

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3  
... Can you show us what your get_from_jack and get_from_jill functions are? I have a feeling that that's where your problem lies. –  Xymostech Nov 21 '12 at 2:48
1  
Change delete[] jack_data; for delete jack_data; –  imreal Nov 21 '12 at 2:48
    
@Nick delete[] jack_data; is probably correct since jack_data appears to be a pointer to an array. Of course it is impossible to tell without looking inside get_from_jack() where I assume the memory is allocated. –  Code-Apprentice Nov 21 '12 at 2:52
    
@Nick Methinks that is there for a reason, but we don't know without seeing get_from_jack(). The fact it has an out-param for the length suggests it is returning new double [n]; –  WhozCraig Nov 21 '12 at 2:52
1  
The easiest way to fix this is probably to rewrite the part between the int main and the return 0;. –  Jerry Coffin Nov 21 '12 at 2:55

2 Answers 2

Every time you use new you must use delete somewhere in your code. Similarly if you use new[], you must use delete[]. Failure to follow these two rules of memory management will cause a memory leak.

For your second question, we need more information. Does the code you gave crash when you run it? What is the error message? Have you used your debugger to track down the line of code that causes the crash? Which line is it?

share|improve this answer

Only call delete on pointers that were created with new.

The line:

delete jill_data;

Is invalid because this memory was not allocated with new.

Additionally you should not return a pointer to a local variable:

vector<double>* get_from_jill()
{   
    vector<double> jills_data;   // This is a local variable
                                 // it is destroyed when the function
                                 // exits. So returning a pointer
                                 // to it will be invalid.
    // STUFF
    return &jills_data;
}

But the bigger issues is your attempts to do manual memory management.
Normally you should avoid this in most cases and use normal objects. In the few cases were you do need to dynamically allocate memory you should manage the memory with smart pointers (in your program there is no need for this).

Change:

double* get_from_jack(int* count)
// into
std::vector<double> get_from_jack(int& count)

And change

vector<double>* get_from_jill()
// into
vector<double>  get_from_jill()
share|improve this answer
    
In this case, should I still declare vector<doulbe>& v = *jill_data; to fit high() function? –  Tian Nov 21 '12 at 3:23
    
@user1247575: No. Get a copy out of the data out of the function get_from_jill(). Then you can call high(&jill_data[0], &jill_data[0] + jill_data.size()); –  Loki Astari Nov 21 '12 at 3:49

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