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Here is the code:

$.ajax({
        url: "script.php",
            success : oneHandler
        });

$.ajax({
        url: "script.php",
            success : twoHandler
        });

When calling these two function calls concurrently is it ensured that "oneHandler" is really called on the response of the first call? In other words, is the appended string checked for match?

What if I add data:

dataType: 'json',
data: {"json": "one"} ,

dataType: 'json',
data: {"json": "two"} ,

respectively?

What if I use the post method?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

When calling these two function calls concurrently is it ensured that "oneHandler" is really called on the response of the first call?

Yes

What if I use the post method?

Doesn't matter. It's guaranteed to call a correct callback

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Of course, JavaScript being a single threaded model in your browser, there's no such thing as truly concurrent; there's only very close together.

Internally, an object is created for each request you make via $.ajax and friends; this object is the one talking to the server and receiving the response. Your success callback is attached to that object.

Because each request is a separate object, it's guaranteed that the correct callback is executed. Note that multiple requests can coexist at the same time, they don't wait for each other to finish; if you want that you could use Deferred.pipe.

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To make sure I understand that correctly: When the browser sends a http-request, it will wait with the next request until an answer has returned or we have a timeout? I would rather imagine the http answer is identified somehow and assigned to the "internal object" ? –  Konstantin Nov 21 '12 at 3:28
    
@Konstantin No, multiple requests can exist at the same time; they don't wait for each other (unless you specifically say so). –  Ja͢ck Nov 21 '12 at 3:35

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