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EDIT - apologies for the typo, i was in a rush, since i had to get out of the building but hmm... might i ask, why the downvotes? just because of a few syntax errors? i'm open to being critiqued, but please be constructive?

thanks for the constructive answers, i've given both an upvote.

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I have an iVar BOOL that i wanted to use throughout this class. i tried to initialize it to YES, but the first time i read it out, it is NO. why is that? This is strange to me because my ints are all retained.

in my .mm file I have something like this:

@interface MyClass : NSObject {
    BOOL myBool;
    int myInt;
}

@end

@implementation MyClass

-(id)init{
    //...
    myInt = 3;
    myBool = YES; //here i set it
    //...
    [self addObjectsToGame];
    //...
}

-(void)addObjectsToGame{
    //...
    assert(myInt == 3);
    assert(myBool);    // <---- this line would fail
    //...
}

@end

i get that i can use a @property with assign, but why does this iVar not retain it's value??

EDIT

okay yeah, wow, something is really messed up here... i tried to replace it with @property and it's still not working. i then tried to "find all in project" for the variable myBool and i'm NOT changing it anywhere else

Note: i'm using cocos2d, but i dont think that should affect anything

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1  
Are you sure that you are not missing a second @end before the @implementation? –  dasblinkenlight Nov 21 '12 at 3:11
    
I don't recognize that syntax for declaring addObjectsToGame where you have the parentheses after the method name. And you're not invoking this as [self addObjectsToGame]. Clearly this isn't a standard Objective-C file. Is this Objective-C++? –  Rob Nov 21 '12 at 3:36
1  
can u give us the real code? -(void)addObjectsToGame() is not valid obj-c –  vikingosegundo Nov 21 '12 at 3:36
    
ah. you're right, it wasn't objective-C code, i just typed it up in an editor, because the real code is REALLY long. but here's what i did - i tried to use XCode's "find all in project" for the variable "myBool", and there was only 1 instance where i was actively changing the value of it - in the init.... and when i went to NSLog("%@",myBool?@"true":@"false"); after the init, the output would give me false... that's why i was so confused –  David T. Nov 21 '12 at 6:47
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3 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I've fixed Objective-C syntax for you and everything works as expected

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface MyClass : NSObject {
    BOOL myBool;
    int myInt;
}
-(void)addObjectsToGame;
@end

@implementation MyClass

-(id)init{
    if (self = [super init])
    {
        myInt = 3;
        myBool = YES; //here i set it
        [self addObjectsToGame];
    }
    return self;
}

-(void)addObjectsToGame{
    assert(myInt == 3);
    assert(myBool);
    NSLog(@"OK");
}

@end


int main(int argc, char *argv[]) {
    @autoreleasepool {
        [MyClass new];
    }
}
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this iVar will retain it's value, as long as you don't do anything else to mess it up

#import <Foundation/Foundation.h>

@interface MyClass : NSObject {
    BOOL myBool;
    int myInt;
}
@end

@implementation MyClass

-(id)init{
    //...
    myInt = 3;
    myBool = YES; //here i set it
    //...
    [self addObjectsToGame];
    //...
    return self;
}

-(void)addObjectsToGame{
    //...
    assert(myInt == 3);
    assert(myBool);    // <---- this line would fail
    //...
    NSLog(@"didn't fail");
}

@end

This code didn't fail

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oh wow, i'm such a noob on iOS -

all BOOL values initialize to NO (rather than random), and the reason i kept getting NO was because i had been using the BOOL right before assigning it, and also that i had made it non-atomic (though this won't matter most of the time)

this was the real reason; however, i'm going to accept someone else's answer seeing this is such a trivial mistake in the making

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1  
"rather than random" - those are C-style auto variables that are stack-allocated. Instance variables are zeroed by the runtime when an instance is created. –  user529758 Nov 24 '12 at 21:59
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