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I am trying to match "new york" in a search (not places containing "new" or "york" separately)

here is my current query:

"query" : {                        
    "query_string" : {            
        "query" : "new york" ,
        "fields" : ["city"]
    }
},
"filter" : {
    "and" : [{
        "query" : {                 
            "query_string" : {                    
                "query" : "country:US"               
             }            
        }
    }]
}               

However this keeps returning places named "york" rather than "new york"

I am not fully understanding how this works and would appreciate some help in getting this to actually work for me.

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I don't know elasticsearch but my guess would be that the space in "new york" acts as a boolean or operator. Try "\"new york\"" maybe. –  Botond Balázs Nov 21 '12 at 3:33
    
Thanks for your reply, it doesn't appear to work when i do that. –  Charlie Smith Nov 21 '12 at 6:05

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want both words to appear in the same document you need to change the default operator like this:

"query" : {                        
    "query_string" : {            
        "query" : "new york" ,
        "fields" : ["city"],
        "default_operator" : "AND"
    }
}

or specify it ion the query:

"query" : {                        
    "query_string" : {            
        "query" : "new AND york" ,
        "fields" : ["city"]
    }
}

Have a look at the query string documentation.

Otherwise, if you want both words to appear close to each other in the same document you need to make a phrase query like this:

"query" : {
    "match_phrase" : {
        "message" : "new york"
    }
}
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