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So, I've got this going on:

def pickClass():
    print('What class are you? FIGHTER, MAGE, or THIEF?')
    classChoice = raw_input()
    if classChoice == 'FIGHTER':
        print('You are a mighty warrior. Are you sure? YES or NO.')
        _confirm = raw_input()
        if _confirm == 'YES':
            print('So be it.')
        elif _confirm == 'NO':
            pickClass()
        else:
            print('YES or NO only!')
            #go back to '_confirm = raw_input()'

The part where I'm stuck is at the very end -- how do I go part to that specific part of the code without going through the entire function again?

(I know it's a little redundant with that print, but whatever, maaaaan)

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1  
This is badly structured. If the user keeps answering "No" you will eventually hit the recursion limit. –  John La Rooy Nov 21 '12 at 3:58

3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You will need to restructure your function. Try something like this:

def pickClass():
    valid_classes = ["FIGHTER", "MAGE", "THIEF"]
    while True:
        print('What class are you? FIGHTER, MAGE, or THIEF?')
        classChoice = raw_input()
        if classChoice not in valid_classes:
            print("Invalid class")
        else:
            print("Are you sure you want to be a %s?" % classChoice)
            while True:
                _confirm = raw_input()
                if _confirm == 'YES':
                    print('So be it.')
                    return classChoice
                elif _confirm == 'NO':
                    break
                else:
                    print('YES or NO only!')
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This is still calling pickClass recursively when the answer is "NO" –  John La Rooy Nov 21 '12 at 3:56
    
That is exactly what I needed -- thank you! The second piece of code is certainly something for me to look into later on as well. –  Alan Nov 21 '12 at 3:56
    
Good point @gnibbler, I didn't look at what the different options actually did. I'll edit with a different structure. –  Tim Nov 21 '12 at 3:57
    
This is a good restructuring. I was just about to post an answer without the recursion. @Alan recursion is considered "unpythonic" in many cases, and while it is still the way to go in some cases, in this case, I think nested while loops are a better choice. –  acjay Nov 21 '12 at 4:05
def pickClass():
    classChoice = None
    while classChoice is None:
        print('What class are you? FIGHTER, MAGE, or THIEF?')
        classChoice = raw_input()
        if classChoice == 'FIGHTER':
            while True:
                print('You are a mighty warrior. Are you sure? YES or NO.')
                _confirm = raw_input()
                if _confirm == 'YES':
                    print('So be it.')
                    break
                elif _confirm == 'NO':
                    break
                print('YES or NO only!')
    return classChoice

Probably it's a good idea to make a confirm function you can reuse for other questions. Notice how this simplifies the logic of pickClass

def confirm(msg):
    while True:
        print(msg)
        _confirm = raw_input()
        if _confirm == 'YES':
            print('So be it.')
            return True
        elif _confirm == 'NO':
            return False
        print('YES or NO only!')


def pickClass():
    while True:
        print('What class are you? FIGHTER, MAGE, or THIEF?')
        classChoice = raw_input()
        if classChoice == 'FIGHTER':
            if confirm('You are a mighty warrior. Are you sure? YES or NO.'):
                return classChoice
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I noticed the redundancies with having the confirm repeated for each class as well and made up my own function for it (but it doesn't catch all the confirmations like yours does) -- thanks again –  Alan Nov 21 '12 at 4:14

You can use while _confirm not in['YES', 'NO'] in this case. Also it makes sense to make confirm() function.

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