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Expected / pseudo example:

stage.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, onClick.someWayToPassParameters(true, 123, 4.56, "string"));
function onClick(e:MouseEvent):void {
    trace("Received " + someWayToRetrieveParameters().b/i/n/s + ".");
}

For many years (3~4), on every website, forum, blog, wherever I searched, people tell me there's no simple way to do this. They usually suggest to:

  • Add the listener to a dynamic object, where you can set the value to an extra property and reference it (e.target.property / e.currentTarget.property) in the function.

    Not all classes are dynamic. It won't work on a Sprite, for example.

  • Extend the class of the object with a custom class to add property or to just make it dynamic.

    You'll have to create a whole new tweak class everytime.

  • Use an anonymous function as the event handler.

    There's no reference (and it's ugly). To remove the listener to free resources you're forced to do it from inside the function itself with arguments.callee.

  • Call another function, using the parameter, inside the event handler.

    And where in the event handler call does the parameter go?

  • Keep the event handler in the same scope as the parameter.

    Breach to a total semantic mess.

  • Encapsulate both event handler definition and addEventListener call in a function receiving the target and parameters.

    It can mix scopes, but it's a close one. You have to be careful, though.

...Among many other suggested workarounds.

All I want is just to pass an argument to the event handler so I can use it inside its function, just like any normal function!

Am I asking for too much?

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edited my answer to use a separate class which handles handler creation, storage and registration. –  Creynders Nov 21 '12 at 12:39
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5 Answers

Out of the box: it only takes 2 extra lines of elegant code to solve this ancient puzzle.

stage.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, onClick(true, 123, 4.56, "string"));
function onClick(b:Boolean, i:int, n:Number, s:String):Function {
  return function(e:MouseEvent):void {
    trace("Received " + b + ", " + i + ", " + n + " and " + s + ".");
  };
}

But most importantly, you will very likely need to remove the listener later to free resources, so +1 line to store it in a variable:

var functionOnClick:Function = onClick(true, 123, 4.56, "string");
stage.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, functionOnClick);
function onClick(b:Boolean, i:int, n:Number, s:String):Function {
  return function(e:MouseEvent):void {
    trace("Received " + b + ", " + i + ", " + n + " and " + s + ".");
  };
}

And you'll be able to remove it normally:

trace("Before: " + stage.hasEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK));
stage.removeEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, functionOnClick);
trace("After: " + stage.hasEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK));

Here's a more elaborated, dynamic example to prove its use:

function onClick(s:String):Function {
  return function(e:MouseEvent):void {
    trace("The square " + s + " at x = " + e.currentTarget.x + "px was clicked");
  };
}
var myFunctions:Array = new Array();
for (var i:int = 0; i < 10; i++) {
  myFunctions.push(onClick("#" + (i+1)));
}
for (i = 0; i < myFunctions.length; i++) {
  var square:Sprite = new Sprite();
  square.name = "sqr" + i;
  square.addChild(new Bitmap(new BitmapData(20, 20, false, 0)));
  square.x = 5 + 25 * i;
  square.addEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, myFunctions[i]);
  stage.addChild(square);
}

No properties through dynamic objects, no custom class, no loose functions, no scope overlap. Just what logic expects it to be: you're simply passing arguments to it.

And to remove every listener properly, you can do it like this later:

for (i = 0; i < myFunctions.length; i++) {
  square = stage.getChildByName("sqr" + i) as Sprite;
  trace("Before (#" + (i+1) + "): " + square.hasEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK));
  square.removeEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK, myFunctions[i]);
  trace("After (#" + (i+1) + "): " + square.hasEventListener(MouseEvent.CLICK));
  stage.removeChild(square);
}

IMHO this is the simplest yet most solid way to do it.

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4  
Of course it is. It's actually "safety-oriented": the lifespan of the function lasts until you get its returning listener, whose reference can be kept in a variable for a sure removal posteriorly. You have control over everything. –  user1837285 Dec 4 '12 at 21:58
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here is an example

var s1:Boolean = true;

station1.addEventListener(MouseEvent.ROLL_OVER, function(e:MouseEvent) : void { spread(e, s1) });
station1.addEventListener(MouseEvent.ROLL_OUT, function(e:MouseEvent) : void { collapse(e, s1) });


function spread(event:MouseEvent ,bb:Boolean):void {
 if(bb != true) event.currentTarget.gotoAndPlay(2);
}

function collapse(event:MouseEvent,bb:Boolean ):void {
    if(bb != true) event.currentTarget.gotoAndPlay(18);
}
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Very good. It worked for me. –  Papa De Beau Jun 20 at 7:37
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I would modify Creynders example slightly:

    protected function createHandler(handler:Function, ...args):Function
    {
        var h:Function = function(e:Event = null):void
        {
            trace(args);

            if (handler != null)
                handler(e);
        }
        return h;
    }

    sm.addEventListener(StyleEvent.STYLE_CHANGE, 
            createHandler(updateStyle, 1,true,"Lorem",["a","b","c"]), 
            false, 0, true);

this way you can use original event handlers and inject the "arguments" to it,

also you could have your handlers to have following signature:

protected function myHandler(e:Event, ...args):void;

then you could pass arguments directly to the target handler:

    protected function createHandler(handler:Function, ...args):Function
    {
        var h:Function = function(e:Event = null):void
        {
            //trace(args);

            if (handler != null)
            {
                args.unshift(e);
                handler.apply(this, args);
            }
        }
        return h;
    }

best regards

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1  
beware the closures –  The_asMan Nov 21 '12 at 14:22
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Passing a parameter directly to the event handler is not possible.

The best approximation is by using a function factory method, IMO

//--EDITED: I created a separate class to maintain parameterized handlers, see https://gist.github.com/4124722

usage is simple:

    public class Usage extends Sprite{

        private var _handlers : ParameterizedHandlerContainer;

        public function ParameterizedEvents()
        {

            _handlers = new ParameterizedHandlerContainer();
            _handlers.registerHandler( this, Event.ADDED_TO_STAGE, someMethod, 3000 );
        }

        private function someMethod( event : Event, amount : uint ):void
        {
            trace( this, 'someMethod', amount );
            _handlers.destroyHandler( arguments.callee, event );
        }


    }

Now you can register parameterized handlers with ParameterizedHandlerContainer#registerHandler and destroy them with ParameterizedHandlerContainer#destroyHandler.

You can pass in any amount of parameters you want, but the first parameter of the callback method must be of type Event or a descendant.

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Edited my answer, abstracted it and added the possibility of removing the handler –  Creynders Nov 21 '12 at 12:38
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Why not use AS3-Signals? Passing a parameter then is as simple as:

import org.osflash.signals.Signal;

public class AlarmClock 
{
    public var alarm:Signal;

    public function AlarmClock() 
    {
        alarm = new Signal(String);
    }

    public function ring():void
    {
        alarm.dispatch("9 AM");
    }
}
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