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I am considering using something like StackFrame stackFrame = new StackFrame(1) to log the executing method, but I don't know about its performance implications. Is the stack trace something that is build anyway with each method call so performance should not be a concern or is it something that is only build when asked for it? Do you recommend against it in an application where performance is very important? If so, does that mean I should disable it for the release?

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2  
Beware that there's an SO-bot that answers all questions like this: Try it! –  harpo Aug 28 '09 at 18:47
2  
Other than just writing the method name out manually in every log statement, you might look into compile-time aspect-oriented-programming libraries, and hook into a compile-time event to capture the method name, and a run-time aspect to log it. PostSharp is one such library. Might be overkill, though. –  Michael Petrotta Aug 28 '09 at 19:32
1  
Another option might be to use eXtensible C# to write a custom compiler attribute to statically generate the logging calls –  STW Aug 28 '09 at 19:42
3  
Sorry, but, I have to say it... "performant" is not a word. whew, feel better :-) –  Ed S. Aug 28 '09 at 19:43
3  
@Hermann - "performant" is a word used primarily in technical circles, and you've used it correctly, in that context. Lots of English-speakers don't like the word, I'm guessing because it feels awkward or too "managerial". It's not in most dictionaries. There are lots of similar words ("actionable", "learnings"), but I like "performant". It fills a gap. –  Michael Petrotta Aug 28 '09 at 20:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 17 down vote accepted

edit: Some background


We have a similar feature which is disabled 99% of the time; we were using an approach like:

public void DoSomething()
{
    TraceCall(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name);
    // Do Something
}

public void TraceCall(string methodName)
{
    if (!loggingEnabled) { return; }
    // Log...
}

TraceCall(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name)

It was simple, but regardless of whether or not tracing was enabled we were incurring the performance hit of using Reflection to lookup the method name.

Our options were to either require more code in every method (and risk simple mistakes or refusal) or to switch to using StackFrame to determine the calling method only when logging was enabled.

Option A:

public void DoSomething()
{
    if (loggingEnabled)
    {
        TraceCall(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name);
    }
    // Do Something
}

public void TraceCall(string methodName)
{
    if (!loggingEnabled) { return; }
    // Log...
}

Option B:

public void DoSomething()
{
    TraceCall();
    // Do Something
}

public void TraceCall()
{
    if (!loggingEnabled) { return; }
    StackFrame stackFrame = new StackFrame(1);
    // Log...
}

We opted for Option B. It offers significant performance improvements over Option A when logging is disabled, 99% of the time and is very simple to implement.

Here's an alteration of Michael's code, to display the cost / benefit of this approach

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;
using System.Reflection;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
	class Program
	{
		static bool traceCalls;

		static void Main(string[] args)
		{
			Stopwatch sw;

			// warm up
			for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
			{
				TraceCall();
			}

			// call 100K times, tracing *disabled*, passing method name
			sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
			traceCalls = false;
			for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
			{
				TraceCall(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());
			}
			sw.Stop();
			Console.WriteLine("Tracing Disabled, passing Method Name: {0}ms"
							 , sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

			// call 100K times, tracing *enabled*, passing method name
			sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
			traceCalls = true;
			for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
			{
				TraceCall(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());
			}
			sw.Stop();
			Console.WriteLine("Tracing Enabled, passing Method Name: {0}ms"
							 , sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

			// call 100K times, tracing *disabled*, determining method name
			sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
			traceCalls = false;
			for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
			{
				TraceCall();
			}
			Console.WriteLine("Tracing Disabled, looking up Method Name: {0}ms"
					   , sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

			// call 100K times, tracing *enabled*, determining method name
			sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
			traceCalls = true;
			for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
			{
				TraceCall();
			}
			Console.WriteLine("Tracing Enabled, looking up Method Name: {0}ms"
					   , sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

			Console.ReadKey();
		}

		private static void TraceCall()
		{
			if (traceCalls)
			{
				StackFrame stackFrame = new StackFrame(1);
				TraceCall(stackFrame.GetMethod().Name);
			}
		}

		private static void TraceCall(MethodBase method)
		{
			if (traceCalls)
			{
				TraceCall(method.Name);
			}
		}

		private static void TraceCall(string methodName)
		{
			// Write to log
		}
	}
}

The Results:

Tracing Disabled, passing Method Name: 294ms
Tracing Enabled,  passing Method Name: 298ms
Tracing Disabled, looking up Method Name: 0ms
Tracing Enabled,  looking up Method Name: 1230ms
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Excellent point: often, you can step back and find another way to solve the problem. new StackFrame() isn't expensive if you never need to call it. –  Michael Petrotta Aug 28 '09 at 19:44
    
@Michael: exactly! it's very clean to implement, easy to unit-test, and the only time we take the performance hit is when we're essentially debugging and performance isn't a concern anyways. –  STW Aug 28 '09 at 19:46
    
I guess it depends on how often you tracing will be enabled then since option B is still 10x slower than option A if tracing is enabled. But now everyone can decide for themselves based on facts. Very insightful. Thanks! –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 20:14
    
I just tried to launch the application without the debug mode and the numbers have changed significantly concerning the use of stackframe. It took 1117ms debugging in Visual Studio, 729ms running the assembly from debug compliation and 569ms running the assembly from release complitation. The other numbers did not changed. Finally using stackframe is only 3 times slower in release mode which is meant to be the final product. –  Ucodia Jul 29 '10 at 8:05

A quick and naive test indicates that for performance-sensitive code, yes, you want to pay attention to this:

Don't generate 100K frames: 3ms

Generate 100K frames: 1805ms

About 20 microseconds per generated frame, on my machine. Not a lot, but a measurable difference over a large number of iterations.

Speaking to your later questions ("Should I disable StackFrame generation in my application?"), I'd suggest you analyze your application, do performance tests like the one I've done here, and see if the performance difference amounts to anything with your workload.

using System;
using System.Diagnostics;

namespace ConsoleApplication
{
    class Program
    {
    	static bool generateFrame;

    	static void Main(string[] args)
    	{
    		Stopwatch sw;

    		// warm up
    		for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    		{
    			CallA();
    		}

    		// call 100K times; no stackframes
    		sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    		for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    		{
    			CallA();
    		}
    		sw.Stop();
    		Console.WriteLine("Don't generate 100K frames: {0}ms"
                                 , sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    		// call 100K times; generate stackframes
    		generateFrame = true;
    		sw = Stopwatch.StartNew();
    		for (int i = 0; i < 100000; i++)
    		{
    			CallA();
    		}
    		Console.WriteLine("Generate 100K frames: {0}ms"
                           , sw.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    		Console.ReadKey();
    	}

    	private static void CallA()
    	{
    		CallB();
    	}

    	private static void CallB()
    	{
    		CallC();
    	}

    	private static void CallC()
    	{
    		if (generateFrame)
    		{
    			StackFrame stackFrame = new StackFrame(1);
    		}
    	}
    }
}
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Thanks Michael! I like the way you tested this since I was concerned about the .NET framework somehow caching the method, but your test seems to show that this is not the case. –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 18:57
    
Yes, I'm not sure how to square the article Paul references with my experience and tests. I've also been walking through the log4net documentation, which calls explicitly calls out how slow generating stackframes (for inclusion in logs) is. –  Michael Petrotta Aug 28 '09 at 19:01
    
I repeated this test applying [MethodImpl(MethodImplOptions.NoInlining)] to each method just in case and I also get about 20µs for each StackFrame with 100k iterations and about 15µs for each StackFrame with 1 million iterations. 15-20 microseconds does not seem too bad. 50 StackFrame creations take only 1 millisecond after all. –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 19:31
    
I don't know, either. It may be the framework calls new StackFrame(), which calls BuildStackFrame(0, false). Or maybe the documentation is misleading. /shrug +1 for actually testing it and reporting the results! –  Paul Williams Aug 28 '09 at 19:33

From the MSDN documentation, it seems like StackFrames are being created all the time:

A StackFrame is created and pushed on the call stack for every function call made during the execution of a thread. The stack frame always includes MethodBase information, and optionally includes file name, line number, and column number information.

The constructor new StackFrame(1) you'd call would do this:

private void BuildStackFrame(int skipFrames, bool fNeedFileInfo)
{
    StackFrameHelper sfh = new StackFrameHelper(fNeedFileInfo, null);
    StackTrace.GetStackFramesInternal(sfh, 0, null);
    int numberOfFrames = sfh.GetNumberOfFrames();
    skipFrames += StackTrace.CalculateFramesToSkip(sfh, numberOfFrames);
    if ((numberOfFrames - skipFrames) > 0)
    {
        this.method = sfh.GetMethodBase(skipFrames);
        this.offset = sfh.GetOffset(skipFrames);
        this.ILOffset = sfh.GetILOffset(skipFrames);
        if (fNeedFileInfo)
        {
            this.strFileName = sfh.GetFilename(skipFrames);
            this.iLineNumber = sfh.GetLineNumber(skipFrames);
            this.iColumnNumber = sfh.GetColumnNumber(skipFrames);
        }
    }
}

GetStackFramesInternal is an external method. CalculateFramesToSkip has a loop that operates exactly once, since you specified only 1 frame. Everything else looks pretty quick.

Have you tried measuring how long it would take to create, say, 1 million of them?

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Thanks Paul. I read the same paragraph in MSDN and tried to track down how it works in Reflector, but didn't really understand it. I was thinking about timing it, but it could be misleading if it is somehow cached after the first call that's why I was hoping someone knew how it worked internally. –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 18:54
1  
Michael's test suggests that the stack frames are not "created and pushed on the call stack for every function call made during the execution of a thread" because it does take longer to ask for it. –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 19:00
2  
Or they may be creating them differently, or it may be a native construct until requested, or the docs may be wrong. I assume the CLR needs to keep track of the managed stack, so there must be something in native memory setup as the stack grows. –  Paul Williams Aug 28 '09 at 19:39

I am considering using something like StackFrame stackFrame = new StackFrame(1) to log the executing method

Out of interest: Why? If you only want the current method, then

string methodName = System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod().Name;

seems better. Maybe not more performant (I didn't compare, but Reflection shows that GetCurrentMethod() does not simply create a StackFrame but does some "magic"), but clearer in it's intent.

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I tried Michael's test with MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod() and you're right, it is actually faster. Takes about 1 microsecond per call on my machine. –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 20:01
    
I just saw yoooder's answer, he makes a good point. –  user65199 Aug 28 '09 at 20:04

I know what you mean, but this example result is overshoot. Executing the GetCurrentMethod even when logging is turned off is a waste. It should be something like:

if (loggingEnabled) TraceCall(MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod());  

Or if you want the TraceCall always executed:

TraceCall(loggingEnabled ? MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod() : null);
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I think Paul Williams hit the nail on the head with the work being done. If you dig deeper into StackFrameHelper you'll find that fNeedFileInfo is actually the performance killer - especially in debug mode. Try setting it false if performance is important. You won't get much useful information in release mode anyway.

If you pass false in here you'll still get method names when doing a ToString() and without outputting any information, just moving stack pointers around, it's very fast.

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