Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Im trying to call a function in C++ and I thought it would be the same as in C, but when trying to convert a C program to C++ I've run into an error where it says functions are undeclared.

Here is my class:

class contacts
 {
  private:;
          char *First_Name;
          char *Last_Name;
          char *home;
          char *cell;
  public:;
  //constructor
         contacts()
         {
         }  
//Function declaration     
void readfile (contacts*friends ,int* counter, int i,char buffer[],FILE*read,char user_entry3[]);

  };

Here is a snippit of my Menu function:

 if(user_entry1==1)
  {
    printf("Please enter a file name");
    scanf("%s",user_entry3); 
    read=fopen(user_entry3,"r+");

   //This is the "undeclared" function
   readfile(friends ,counter,i,buffer,read,user_entry3);
   }else;

I'm obviously doing something wrong, but every time I try and compile I get readfile undeclared(first use this function) What am I doing wrong here?

share|improve this question
    
classes –  tuxuday Nov 21 '12 at 4:42
1  
You do not need semicolons after public and private. –  Trevor Hickey Nov 21 '12 at 4:54

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Is the "Menu" function from inside the class contacts? The way you have designed it, it can be only called on an instance of the the class. You have options based on exactly what readfile means to contacts

Im guessing the function reads all contacts and not just 1 contact, which means it can be made a static function

static void readfile(... ;

And call as

contacts::readfile(...;

Alternatively if you dont need direct access to internals of the class you can just declare it outside the class (as a free function, similar to normal C functions) and use exactly as you are doing now. This is in fact what the compiler is searching for when it comes across your code.

Also, I suggest you rename class contacts -> class contact since it appears that objects each holds the contact information of only 1 person.

share|improve this answer
    
would it be static void or static void contact:: because when I just make it static void it says char* contacts::First_Name is private –  user1781966 Nov 21 '12 at 5:40
    
static void would do if your function declaration and all its code is inside the class. If the definition (the body) is outside it would just be void contacts::, there is no need to repeat the static again. –  Karthik T Nov 21 '12 at 5:55
    
does this change once you need to call a function within the main? because when i try and call the menu function within the main I get no matching function for call to contacts::menu(contacts*[5],int*, int&, char[50])' ` –  user1781966 Nov 21 '12 at 7:02
    
What does the menu function look like? Is it static? If not you need to make an object of type contacts and call menu on it, like the way naveen suggested. If all of this is new to you, I suggest you read up on the basics of classes in c++, would be more helpful. –  Karthik T Nov 23 '12 at 1:27

You need to create an object of contacts class and then call readfile on that object. Like this: contacts c; c.readfile();.

share|improve this answer
    
the class seems to be 1 contact, but the function seems to be reading an entire array. it is better to make it static than call on object. –  Karthik T Nov 21 '12 at 4:47
    
You also do not need the null else at the end of the if block. The ending brace tells the compiler where the if block ends, and if the next token after the brace is not the 'else' keyword then the compiler treats the next token as the beginning of a new program statement. –  Jeff D. Nov 21 '12 at 5:18

I recommend refactoring to use the STL vector.

#include <vector>
#include <ReaderUtil>

using namespace std;

vector< contact > myContactCollection;
myContactCollection.push_back( Contact("Bob",....) );
myContactCollection.push_back( Contact("Jack",....) );
myContactCollection.push_back( Contact("Jill",....) );

Or...

myContactCollection = ReaderClass::csvparser(myFile);

where

ReaderClass::csvparser(std::string myFile) returns vector<Contact>
share|improve this answer

Since your readfile function is inside the contacts class, then the answer above is technically correct in that you need to create an instance of the object then call the function. However, from an OO perspective, your class function should in general only operate on members of the objects of the class that contains it. What you have here is more like a general purpose function which takes parameters of many types and only one of them is a pointer to the class that itself contains the function you are calling which if you think about it is kind of strange. So you would be passing a pointer to the class to a member function of the class which would require two instances of it. You cannot think of a class as a simple substitution for a pointer to a structure. Since this is a class, you declare all the variables you need as members of the class so there is no need to pass them as parameters (one of the main points of a class is to isolate general data from class member data). Here is an update that should point you in the right direction.

   class contacts
     {
      private:

          char *First_Name;
          char *Last_Name;
          char *home;
          char *cell;
          FILE *read;  // these all could also be declared as a stack variable in 'readfile'


    public:
    //constructor

    contacts()
        {
        }  

    //destruction
    ~contacts()
    {
    }

    //Function declaration     
    int contacts::readfile (char * userEnteredFilename);

    };


    contacts myContact = new contacts();

    printf("Please enter a file name");
    scanf("%s",user_entry3); 

    int iCount = myContact->readfile(user_entry3);

    // the readfile function should contain all of the file i/O code 
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.