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public class A{
    private static flag;

    public void count(){
        flag++;
    }
}

public class B extends A{
    public void count(){
        super.count();
    }
}

public class C extends A{
    public void count(){
        super.count();
    }
}

}

public class D extends A{
    public void count(){
        super.count();
    }
}

Lets us suppose my classes are executed in the following manner class B Class C class D

Now i want to know that what will be the value of flag instance variable after Class D count method

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closed as not a real question by Matt Ball, talonmies, Sameer, Jim Garrison, Firo Nov 21 '12 at 7:30

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

4  
why don't you try it yourself and check the value ? –  Abubakkar Rangara Nov 21 '12 at 5:00
    
why not just executing it and printing? –  Nikolay Kuznetsov Nov 21 '12 at 5:00
1  
-1 for laziness. –  Matt Ball Nov 21 '12 at 5:01
3  
It has no value, as the code doesn't compile. –  T.J. Crowder Nov 21 '12 at 5:02
    
-1 as this really isn't constructive at all. –  Isaac Nov 21 '12 at 5:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

tldr; a "static field" or "class variable" represents a single variable shared among all instances of a class (including subclasses):

Sometimes, you want to have variables that are common to all objects. This is accomplished with the static modifier. Fields that have the static modifier in their declaration are called static fields or class variables. They [static fields] are associated with the class, rather than with any object. Every instance of the class shares a class variable, which is in one fixed location in memory. Any object can change the value of a class variable, but class variables can also be manipulated without creating an instance of the class.

There is only one variable with that particular name. In this case the class qualified name is A.flag (prepending the package would make it fully qualified). Java just allows static fields be accessed in an instance-qualified manner, which I would consider a historical mistake .. as static fields exist independent of any instance.

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1  
+1 for pointing out historical mistakes. –  Thilo Nov 21 '12 at 5:14

Assuming you correct the declaration:

private static int flag;

...until/unless someone actually creates an instance of A, B, C, or D, flag is 0 because that's the value it gets at initialization.

If you start instantiating things and calling their count function (you have to instantiate them to do that, as count is not static), its value will be increased by the code in A#count. Because it's a static, the same member is shared across instances. Thus:

new A().count();
// Now it's 1
new B().count();
// Now it's 2

Etc.

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You would be simply calling flag++ three times. So the final value would be flag+3 (You have to initialize flag). You have to take care of concurrency issues though.

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It's static, so however many times you call it, that's what the value will be if all you're doing is incrementing it each time no matter which class you call it from.

Not sure if that's the question or not.

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I want to know that if i am extending the class that should it be compiled again or not? –  Naveen Chauhan Nov 21 '12 at 5:02
    
i am talking about extending class. –  Naveen Chauhan Nov 21 '12 at 5:03

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