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I was wondering if there is a more elegant way of writing the following lines:

section_event_hash = []
sections.each do |s|
   section_event_hash << { s => s.find_all_events }
end

I want to create a hash whose keys are the elements of sections, and the values are arrays of elements returned by the find_all_events method.

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The question is not clear. The variable name section_event_hash suggests it is a hash, and your code assigns an array to it, and you say you want to create a hash. –  sawa Nov 21 '12 at 5:57

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

The code you posted isn't quite doing what you said you want. Let's take a closer look at it by testing like so:

sections = ["ab", "12"]

section_event_hash = []
sections.each do |s|
   section_event_hash << { s => s.split("") }
end

puts section_event_hash.inspect

Gives:

[{"ab"=>["a", "b"]}, {"12"=>["1", "2"]}]

So you've actually created an array of hashes, where each hash contains one key-value pair.

The following code produces one hash with multiple elements. Notice how an empty hash is created with {} instead of []. Curly braces are the symbol for a hash, while the square brackets refer to a particular key.

section_event_hash = {}
sections.each do |s|
   section_event_hash[s] = s.split("")
end

puts section_event_hash.inspect

=> {"ab"=>["a", "b"], "12"=>["1", "2"]}

As for a "more elegant" way of doing it, well that depends on your definition. As the other answers here demonstrate, there is usually more than one way to do something in ruby. seph's produces the same data structure as your original code, while mu's produces the hash you describe. Personally, I'd just aim for code that is easy to read, understand, and maintain.

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If you want section_event_hash to really be a Hash rather than an Array, then you could use each_with_object:

section_event_hash = sections.each_with_object({}) { |s, h| h[s] = s.find_all_events }

You could use map to build an array of arrays and then feed that to Hash\[\]:

section_event_hash = Hash[sections.map { |s| [s, s.find_all_events] }]
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array_of_section_event_hashes = sections.map do |s|
  {s => s.find_all_events}
end
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