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I'm learning Java and trying to understand how private, protected and public modifiers affect bindings.

I wrote this code:

public class A {

    public void a() {
        System.out.println("a in A.");
        b();
    }

    private void b() {
        System.out.println("b in A.");
    }


    public static void main(String[] args) {
        B obj = new B();
        obj.a();
    }
} 

class B extends A {
    public void b() {
        System.out.println("b in B.");
    }
}

The output is:

a in A.
b in A.

Still, B has it's own b method, and obj is B's instance. Why the output isn't the following?

a in A.
b in B.

But if I change b method in A to the following:

public void b() {
    System.out.println("b in A.");
}

the output changes to the expected:

a in A.
b in B.

So, why doesn't b behave like virtual function when it's declared with private keyword in A?

share|improve this question
    
@HunterMcMillen In the very first code snippet. –  ovgolovin Nov 21 '12 at 6:06
    
Yeah my mistake, I read through it twice and still missed private –  Hunter McMillen Nov 21 '12 at 6:07

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Because private methods (and fields) are invisible outside of the class, including to subclasses. So a private method is not part of the outside interface and cannot be overridden.

That class B declares a method of the same name with the same signature does not matter. The private method is completely invisible to B, so it might as well have a different name. The two methods have no relationship at all.

When you make the method public (or protected) it becomes part of the class' API and can be overridden.

It is good practice (and an IDE will do that automatically for you) to annotate all methods that you think override something with @Override. Then the compiler will tell you if it does not (you would have gotten a compile error with this example), so this helps to catch spelling mistakes, mismatched signatures and stuff.

share|improve this answer
    
But obj is an instance of B. So shouldn't b() call b declared in B? Why does it call b declared in A? –  ovgolovin Nov 21 '12 at 6:08
    
the call to b() is in a(), which is defined in class A (which knows that it is calling a private method, which cannot be overridden). If you put the same code in class B, it would in fact, call B's method. Same source code does not always have the same effect. Again, private methods cannot be overridden (are "not virtual"). –  Thilo Nov 21 '12 at 6:13
    
I got it. Thanks! So when the compiler sees that the method is private, it just substitutes it in all the functions in the same class to avoid overhead connected with dynamic method resolution. Correct?! –  ovgolovin Nov 21 '12 at 6:19
    
I don't know about "substitute", but yes, dynamic method resolution does not take place. –  Thilo Nov 21 '12 at 6:31

That is because as per JLS,

A private class member or constructor is accessible only within the body of the top level class (§7.6) that encloses the declaration of the member or constructor. It is not inherited by subclasses.

So the above answer your question. But had the case been there for protected or public, then this is valid:

class Ex{
   protected void a()
   {        
   }
} 


 class Child extends Ex{
    @Override
    public void a()
    {

    }
 }
`
share|improve this answer
    
Yeah. But I may define another method with the same name in the subclass. And if the object is the instance of the subclass, then it's not very clear that this method will be used not from the subclass (in my case B), but from the class this method is being called (in my case A). –  ovgolovin Nov 21 '12 at 6:25
    
A subclass method will only be called if it overrides the above one. In your case, it doesnt override hence the call is not dispatched to the lower method –  Jatin Nov 21 '12 at 6:29

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