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My declaration is as follows

#include <vector>
#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

typedef struct _ListofHops_T
{
  int macAddrLtr;
  int ttlValue;
}ListofHops;


struct ReadActivateLinkTrace
{
   typedef std::vector < ListofHops *> ListofHopsList;
   bool operationState;
};


int main()
{
    ReadActivateLinkTrace readLinkTrace;

    for (size_t listItr=0; listItr < readLinkTrace.ListofHopsList.size(); listItr++)
    {
      .....
    }
}

I am trying to declare a vector of list of hops struct within a struct ReadActivateLinkTrace.

  1. Is the above declaration valid.
  2. I get the following error compiling

vector.cpp:23: error: invalid use of ReadActivateLinkTrace::ListofHopsList

I am new to vectors . how can i acess/iterate through vector of structures defined in a structure?

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2 Answers

The declaration is valid, but it doesn't do what you think. ListofHopsList is a type (hint: typedef), not a variable. You're probably looking for

struct ReadActivateLinkTrace
{
   std::vector < ListofHops *> ListofHopsList;
   bool operationState;
};

The problem wasn't with the vector itself, but with the fact that you weren't declaring a member, but defining a new type.

Also, is there any reason you're using a vector of pointers as opposed to a vector of objects?

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thanks Luchian, It was of much help :) –  user1840954 Nov 21 '12 at 7:25
    
@user accept the answer if it answers your question - give it a check mark. –  Yakk Nov 21 '12 at 8:31
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ReadActivateLinkTrace::ListofHopsList is a typedef, which only declares an alias for a name of a type. It does not define an actual object of that type. You apparently want:

struct ReadActivateLinkTrace
{
   std::vector < ListofHops *> ListofHopsList;
   bool operationState;
};

You should probably have some second thoughts about that being a vector of pointers though. At least offhand, it doesn't seem very likely that a pointer is the best choice here. While you're at it, this:

typedef struct _ListofHops_T
{
  int macAddrLtr;
  int ttlValue;
}ListofHops;

Is pretty horrible in a couple of ways. First the typedef here is only needed in C code, not C++. Second, the name _ListofHops_T is reserved for the implementation, so using it gives undefined behavior. This should be just:

struct ListofHops { 
   int macAddrLtr;
   int ttlValue;
};
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