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In the below program, I have 2 buffers, one which is 64byte aligned and another, which I am assuming is 16 byte aligned on my 64 Linux host running 2.6.x kernel.

The cache line is 64byte long. So, in this program, I simply access one cache line at a time. I was hoping to see posix_memaligned to be equal if not faster than the non aligned buffer. Here are some metrics

./readMemory 10000000

time taken by posix_memaligned buffer: 293020299 
time taken by standard buffer: 119724294 

./readMemory 100000000

time taken by posix_memaligned buffer: 548849137 
time taken by standard buffer: 211197082 

#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>
#include <linux/time.h>

void now(struct timespec * t);

int main(int argc, char **argv)
{        
  char *buf;        
  struct timespec st_time, end_time;        
  int runs;        
  if (argc !=2) 
  {
             printf("Usage: ./readMemory <number of runs>\n");                
             exit(1);        
  }        
  errno = 0;        
  runs = strtol(argv[1], NULL, 10);        
  if (errno !=0)        {
            printf("Invalid number of runs: %s \n", argv[1]);
            exit(1);
    }

    int returnVal = -1;

    returnVal = posix_memalign((void **)&buf, 64, 1024);
    if (returnVal != 0)
    {
            printf("error in posix_memaligh\n");
    }

    char tempBuf[64];
    char * temp = buf;

    size_t cpyBytes = 64;

    now(&st_time);
    for(int x=0; x<runs; x++) {
    temp = buf;
    for(int i=0; i < ((1024/64) -1); i+=64)
    {
            memcpy(tempBuf, temp, cpyBytes);
            temp += 64;
    }
    }
    now(&end_time);

    printf("time taken by posix_memaligned buffer: %ld \n", (end_time.tv_nsec - st_time.tv_nsec));

    char buf1[1024];        
    temp = buf1;        
    now(&st_time);        
    for(int x=0; x<runs; x++) 
    {        
      temp = buf1;        
      for(int i=0; i < ((1024/64) -1); i+=64)        
     {                
        memcpy(tempBuf, temp, cpyBytes);                
        temp += 64;        
      }          
    }        
    now(&end_time);        
    printf("time taken by standard buffer: %ld \n", (end_time.tv_nsec - st_time.tv_nsec));
    return 0;
}

void now(struct timespec *tnow)
{
    if(clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC_RAW, tnow) <0 )
    {
            printf("error getting time");
            exit(1);
    }
}

The disassembly for first loop is

    movq    -40(%rbp), %rdx        
    movq    -48(%rbp), %rcx        
    leaq    -176(%rbp), %rax
    movq    %rcx, %rsi
    movq    %rax, %rdi
    call    memcpy
    addq    $64, -48(%rbp)
    addl    $64, -20(%rbp)

The disassembly of second loop is

    movq    -40(%rbp), %rdx
    movq    -48(%rbp), %rcx
    leaq    -176(%rbp), %rax
    movq    %rcx, %rsi
    movq    %rax, %rdi
    call    memcpy
    addq    $64, -48(%rbp)
    addl    $64, -4(%rbp)
share|improve this question
    
Can you show the disassembly of the two inner loops? –  Mysticial Nov 21 '12 at 6:33
1  
Well clearly it's got nothing to do with the assembly... hehe –  Mysticial Nov 21 '12 at 6:44
    
My version of GCC optimizes the loops to nothing...so they both execute equally fast. That's on Mac OS X 10.8.2 with i686-apple-darwin11-llvm-gcc-4.2 (GCC) 4.2.1 (Based on Apple Inc. build 5658) (LLVM build 2336.11.00). –  Jonathan Leffler Nov 21 '12 at 6:56
    
You might want to add the CPU you have. How memory alignment affect performance, that depends on CPU model. Many CPU architectures don't even allow unaligned memory access (resulting in "Bus error" fault, crashing the program just like segmentaion fault would), but x86 and x64 do allow it. –  hyde Nov 21 '12 at 8:58
1  
BTW: this could be a L2 cache effect. The second case could fit into one L2 slot, the first one will need (at least) two, because stack and heap are too far apart. –  wildplasser Nov 21 '12 at 21:06

3 Answers 3

It's possible that the reason is the relative alignment of the buffers.

memcpy works fastest when copying word-aligned data (32/64 bits).
If both buffers are well-aligned, all is OK.
If both buffers are mis-aligned the same way, memcpy handles it by copying a small-prefix byte by byte, then running word by word on the remainder.

But if one buffer is word-aligned and the other isn't, there's no way to have both reads and writes word aligned. So memcpy still works word by word, but one half of the memory accesses are badly aligned.

If both your stack buffers are unaligned the same way (e.g. both addresses are 8*x+2), but the buffer from posix_memalign is aligned, it can explain what you see.

share|improve this answer

There are a few problems with your benchmark:

  • Your run-time is too short, hence you may be seeing a lot of noise/jitter.
  • If you have CPU frequency scaling enabled the first loop may be executing before the CPU switches into full/turbo frequency. You need to warm up the CPU first or, better, turn off the frequency scaling during benchmarking.
  • You may be observing scheduling because you are not running with real-time priority.
  • Each run you get only one sample, you'd need at the very least 30 runs to be in a position to make any kind of scientific judgment (a scientific study with one sample is commonly called an anecdote).
share|improve this answer

When I swapped you measurement blocks - that is, run standard buffer measurement first and posix_memalign second, I get exactly opposite results. In other words, first copy loop for my CPU (Intel Core 2) is almost always slower than second, no matter how aligned they are.

I have tried to malloc() standard buffer rather than having it on stack - it almost does not make any difference for speed, first loop is still always slower.

I also tried to posix_memalign() your small 64-byte buffer - it did not make any difference.

EDIT: I have edited your code to do 3 measurements: posix aligned, malloc'ed, and buffer on stack (see code below).

It turns out that only the very first loop is slow. Any subsequent loop is taking almost exactly the same time (with some small noise).

I believe that we are observing Linux scheduler ramping up CPU clock speed as soon as it sees 100% CPU load.

Results of my run:

$ ./readmemory 2000000 5
time taken by posix aligned: 19599140
time taken by std malloc   : 14711350
time taken by std on stack : 14680668
time taken by posix aligned: 14729273
time taken by std malloc   : 14685338
time taken by std on stack : 14839183
time taken by posix aligned: 14709836
time taken by std malloc   : 15551900
time taken by std on stack : 14659350
time taken by posix aligned: 14721298
time taken by std malloc   : 14691732
time taken by std on stack : 14691246
time taken by posix aligned: 14722127
time taken by std malloc   : 15538286
time taken by std on stack : 14723657

Updated code:

// compile with: g++ readmemory.c -o readmemory -lrt

#include <time.h>
#include <errno.h>
#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define BUF_SIZE 1024
#define COPY_BYTES 64

void now(struct timespec *tnow) {
    if (clock_gettime(CLOCK_MONOTONIC, tnow) < 0) {
        printf("error getting time");
        exit(1);
    }
}

void measure(char * buf, int runs, const char * msg) {
    char tempBuf[64];
    struct timespec st_time, end_time;
    char * temp;
    now(&st_time);
    for (int x=0; x<runs; x++) {
        temp = buf;
        for (int i=0; i < ((BUF_SIZE/COPY_BYTES) - 1); i+=COPY_BYTES) {
            memcpy(tempBuf, temp, COPY_BYTES);
            temp += COPY_BYTES;
        }
    }
    now(&end_time);
    printf("time taken by %s: %ld\n", msg, end_time.tv_nsec - st_time.tv_nsec);
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
    char * buf1;         // posix_memalign'ed
    char * buf2;         // malloc'ed
    char buf3[BUF_SIZE]; // alloc on stack
    int rc = -1;
    int runs;
    int loops;
    if (argc != 3) {
        printf("Usage: ./readMemory <runs> <loops>\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    errno = 0;
    runs    = strtol(argv[1], NULL, 0);
    if (errno != 0) {
        printf("Invalid number of runs: %s \n", argv[1]);
        exit(1);
    }
    loops = strtol(argv[2], NULL, 0);

    rc = posix_memalign((void **)&buf1, COPY_BYTES, BUF_SIZE);
    if (rc != 0) {
        printf("error in posix_memalign\n");
        exit(1);
    }
    buf2 = (char *) malloc(BUF_SIZE);
    if (buf2 == NULL) {
        printf("error in malloc\n");
        exit(1);
    }

    for (int i=0; i<loops; i++) {
        measure(buf1, runs, "posix aligned");
        measure(buf2, runs, "std malloc   ");
        measure(buf3, runs, "std on stack ");
    }

    return 0;
}

I think we are observing rather complicated ways modern CPUs implement caching.

share|improve this answer
    
I revised the program, so that posix_memalign's loop is run 10 times. I agree with your observation that first loop is always slow, BUT, there after, the result follows the same pattern as described above, where the remainder 9 metrics for posix_memalign loop, though faster than the first loop, are still way higher than the standard buffer loop. Also, the remainder 9 loops dont show much variability as expected. Try running this test with runs=100, 1000, 10000, 100000 and so on, and you will observe that with smaller runs like 100,000 posix_memalign is way higher than standard buffer. –  Jimm Nov 21 '12 at 15:45
    
Doesn't stackoverflow.com/a/13490025/412080 explain what you are observing here? –  Maxim Egorushkin Nov 21 '12 at 20:52
    
@MaximYegorushkin how? It suggests that cpu warm up, which i have eliminated now by running both the loops several times and smoothing out any initial slow readings... –  Jimm Nov 22 '12 at 21:46

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