Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have this segment of testing code (there is quite a lot of other material; however, it is extremely dense and likely irrelevant to this question), which has been producing some inexplicable output. When compiled, this block:

cout << team1[m].rating << endl;
cout << team2[n].rating << endl;
cout << team1.size() << endl;
cout << team2.size() << endl;
cout << (team2[n].rating - team1[m].rating) / team2.size() << endl;
cout << (team1[m].rating - team2[n].rating) / team1.size() << endl;

produces the output:

10 
30 
2 
2 
10 
2147483638

'team1' and 'team2' are both of type vector<player> (without backslash) and the 'player' struct appears as follows:

struct player {
string name;
int rating;
player(string Name, int Rating) :
    name(Name), rating(Rating) {}
};
share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This occurs because the size() function of std::vector returns a size_t, which is unsigned. When dividing an int (such as the rating) by a size_t, the int is promoted to an unsigned int.

Converting a negative number to an unsigned value will cause that value to underflow, becoming larger than the maximum positive value which can be represented by the original signed type.

In order to prevent this, you need to explicitly state that the size() arguments should be converted to int before the division.

cout << (team2[n].rating - team1[m].rating) / static_cast<int>(team2.size()) << endl;
cout << (team1[m].rating - team2[n].rating) / static_cast<int>(team1.size()) << endl;
share|improve this answer
add comment

team1.size() and team2.size() are unsigned (size_t) - change your code to:

cout << (team2[n].rating - team1[m].rating) / static_cast<int>(team2.size()) << endl;
cout << (team1[m].rating - team2[n].rating) / static_cast<int>(team1.size()) << endl;
share|improve this answer
    
Why do you assume that the required result is signed? It's very possible that an absolute value is needed in the calculation –  icepack Nov 21 '12 at 8:27
    
@icepack: in the absence of any information from the OP to the contrary about the expected result I can only work with the provided information - it appears that the modulo wraparound from the unsigned promotion is what is "unexpected" in this case. I'm sure the OP will clarify further if some other behaviour is required. –  Paul R Nov 21 '12 at 8:31
add comment

(team1[m].rating - team2[n].rating) is equal to -20. This expression result is being promoted to unsigned int according to rules of mixed expressions and divided by team1.size(), yielding 2147483638 which is the unsigned int equivalent for signed int -10.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.