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let's say i have this generic class which does some work and produces a result:

public abstract class Work<T> {

    private T mResult;

    public Work(T result) {
        mResult = result;
    }

    public abstract <T> void doWork(T result);

    public T getResult() {
        return mResult;
    }
}

For the users of this class i want type safety that would look something like this:

Work<MyResult> work = new Work<MyResult>(new MyResult()){
    public void work(MyResult result){
        //...
    }
}

The problem is Java doesn't work this way and forces me to cast from the generic type:

Work<MyResult> work = new Work<MyResult>(new MyResult()){
    public <T> void work (T result){
        // (MyResult)result - not nice
    }
}

Is there a way to have type safety in a nice way like in the first example?

Thanks, Teo

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You don't need the <T> in the declaration of doWork, because you want to use the T that is declared at the class level - you need

public abstract void doWork(T result);

The current declaration is the same as

public abstract <A> void doWork(A result);

it isn't necessarily the same T as the rest of your class.

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Try this instead:

Work<MyResult> work = new Work<MyResult>(new MyResult()){
    public void work(MyResult result){
      // Do something
    }
}

Your current design of the Work class is a little strange. I'm not sure why your doWork method requires a result object as an argument. The abstract class also seems to offer little in the way of functionality (although I appreciate this may be a prototype). Perhaps consider an interface instead:

public interface Work<T> {    

    public T doWork();   
}
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