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I've got the following code:

print "\n1 & 11\n";
var_dump(1 & 11);

print "\n 2 & 222\n";
var_dump(2 & 222);

Why is the first result 1 ? And why is the second result 2?

The PHP Web site says that 2 & 222 (for example) should give me back a boolean value:

For example, $a & $b == true evaluates the equivalency then the bitwise and; while ($a & $b) == true evaluates the bitwise and then the equivalency."

I don't get it, how can 2 & 222 be 2 ?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In bits:

  1. 01
  2. 10
  3. 11

The & operator returns all bits set to 1 in both numbers. So:

  • 1 & 2 -> 01 & 10 -> 00 == 0
  • 2 & 3 -> 10 & 11 -> 10 == 2
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& does a bitwise AND. That is, it does an AND operation on all the bits of the input.

In binary:

2       = 0000000010
222     = 1011011110
2 & 222 = 0000000010 ( = 2)

Do not confuse & with &&. & does a bitwise AND while && does a logical AND.

2 && 222 = true
2 &  222 = 2

As for 1 & 11

1      = 0001
11     = 1011
1 & 11 = 0001 ( = 1)

So, 1 & 11 = 1

Further reading:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Binary_and#AND

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AND_gate

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The single ampersand is the bitwise-and operator.
The quote you've posted is telling you that you should be aware of operator precedence when doing bit-operations and comparison. You'd might expect that $a & $b == true tests whether certains bits are set in $a, but it's equivalent to

$a & (int)($b==true)

Since you don't mix bit-operations and comparision in var_dump(1&11); or var_dump(2 & 222); that note shouldn't bother you.
It's a plain bitwise-and as explained at https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bitwise_operation#AND

see also:
http://docs.php.net/language.operators.precedence
http://docs.php.net/language.types.type-juggling

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