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If my interface has the signature only for getter such as:

public interface IInterface 
{
   object Id{get;}
}

So the interface only dictates a public getter for Id on any implemented class now when i have the class :

public class Simple : IInterface
{
  object Id
  {
    get{return something;} 
    set{ do something else;}
  }
}

the compiler complains about the setter as the setter is not defined in the interface. However I didnt dictate anything on the interface contract for a setter; why does the interface insist on the setter on the derived classes ?

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What is the actual compiler error? –  John Fisher Aug 28 '09 at 20:33
    
The compiler error you get from his class would be that Id can't implement the interface because it's non-public. –  Reed Copsey Aug 28 '09 at 20:34
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2 Answers

You just need to make Id public. For example, this compiles fine:

public interface IInterface
{
    object Id { get; }
}
public class Simple : IInterface
{
    private int something;
    public object Id
    {
        get { return something; }
        set{ something = (int)value;}
    }
}
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When i declare the Id as explicit declaration I cant use public , do you know why? –  VolkanUzun Aug 28 '09 at 20:40
    
Yes. Explicit declarations are different - they are inherently public but ONLY when used as the interface itself (interfaces are always public). However, an explicit implementation will not allow the setter, since the interface (which is what you'd be using) will only have a getter on the property. –  Reed Copsey Aug 28 '09 at 20:47
    
but then again, why does the interface care about the setter? I see that the way interface interprets the code is: there is only a getter so it should be readonly; but cant you also interpret is as: i only care that there should be a getter; that is the contract; i dont care about the setter –  VolkanUzun Aug 28 '09 at 20:58
    
It doesn't care - but if you define it explicitly, you're defining the access "for use only as an IInterface", which IInterface "explicitly" does NOT have a setter. It makes no sense to have a setter there, so the compiler complains. –  Reed Copsey Aug 28 '09 at 22:21
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In designing .net, Microsoft decided to make there be three non-interchangeable types of properties: read-only, write-only, and read-write. In C#, if one declares a read-write property with the same name as one or more interface properties one is supposed to implement, the compiler can automatically create not only the read-write property the programmer actually specified, but read-only and/or write-only properties as needed to satisfy the interfaces. For example, if interface IReadableFoo implements a read-only property Foo, IWritableFoo implements a write-only property Foo, and IReadWriteFoo inherits IReadableFoo and IWritablefoo, and implements a "new" read-write property Foo, and a class ReadWriteFoo implements IReadWriteFoo and declares a public read-write property Foo, the compiler will have ReadWriteFoo generate interface implementations of read-only property IReadableFoo.Foo, write-only property IWritableFoo.Foo, and read-write property IReadWriteFoo.Foo.

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