Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

We have a functions library and some utility variables are stored in two diferent ways depending on the app context desktop app/website

In website we use Sessions and in desktop static variables and we would like to unite and automatize the getters//setters for those variables without affecting performance too much

Example:

public static class Cons
{
   public static bool webMode;
}

public static class ConsWEB
{
     public static string Username
     {
       get{ return HttpContext.Current.Session["username"].ToString();}
       set{ HttpContext.Current.Session["username"]=value;}
     }
}

public static class ConsAPP
{    
     private static string _username;
     public static string Username
     {
       get{ return _username;}
       set{ _username=value;}
     }
}

Solution 1 we thought, using IFs (seems bad for performance, take into account accessing variables lots of times, and in some cases the variables are custom classes with complex contents):

public static class Cons
{
   public static bool webMode;

   public static string Username
   {
       get{ return webMode? ConsWEB.Username : ConsAPP.Username; }
       set
       { 
           if(webMode) { ConsWEB.Username = value; }
           else        { ConsAPP.Username = value; }
       }
   }
}

Solution 2 using delegates, at the Static Class constructor associate delegated methods to each get and set depending on the case. If is webMode point to the get/set methods of ConsWEB, otherwise to the get/set methods of ConsAPP...

Is the solution 2 the best one performance-wise? Are there other methodologies for this cases?

share|improve this question
4  
Why not declare an IUsernameProvider interface, and have two concrete implementations? –  Marc Gravell Nov 21 '12 at 11:53
    
Research dependency injection: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163739.aspx –  Joel Etherton Nov 21 '12 at 12:34

1 Answer 1

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Neither is optimal...

First, forget about performance think design first.

You should do it through an interface or similar:

public interface IConsProvider
{
  string UserName { get; set; }
}

Now your implementations (NOTE: you should not really be compiling for both desktop and web in the same assembly. System.Web, for example, is not available in Client Profile - which you should really use for desktop apps).

public class WebConsProvider : IConsProvider
{
  public string UserName
  {
    // DON'T USE .ToString()!  If it's null you get NullReferenceException!
    get{ return HttpContext.Current.Session["username"] as string; }
    set{ HttpContext.Current.Session["username"]=value; }
  }
}

public class DefaultConsProvider : IConsProvider 
{
   public string UserName 
   {
     get; set;
   }
}

And then your environment static:

public static class Cons 
{
  //initialise to default as well - only web apps need change it
  private static IConsProvider _provider = new DefaultConsProvider();
  public static IConsProvider Provider 
  {
    get { return _provider; }
    set { _provider = value; /* should check for null here and throw */ }
  }

  //if you really want you can then wrap the properties
  public static string UserName 
  {
    get {
      return _provider.UserName;
    }
    set {
      _provider.UserName = value;
    }
  }
}

Now you have an extensible provider whose implementation you do not need to worry about.

I do personally also have an issue with wrapping HttpContext.Current - however in most scenarios that does work fine - if you have any asynchrony going on, however, then you have to be careful.

Also - as I mention in my comments - you no longer need to wrap the properties as statics in Cons now. Indeed you gain an awful lot of testability and extensibility by changing code like this:

public void TraceUserName()
{
  Trace.WriteLine(Cons.UserName ?? "[none]");
}

To this:

public void TraceUserName(IConsProvider provider)
{
  Trace.WriteLine(provider.UserName ?? "[none]");
}

Believe me there will be times in your code where you'll wish "just for this call I'd like to override the UserName - but I can't, because it's a static property".

Finally you now have another extensibility mechanism at your disposal that you don't with statics : extension methods.

Say you add a common storage mechanism to the interface for strings:

string this[string key] { get; set; }

So that's a string indexer, allowing us to implement a dictionary-like functionality for unforeseen values. Assume they've both been implemented, with a Dictionary<string, string> in the DefaultConsProvider and wrapping the Session in the WebConsProvider).

Now if I'm writing an additional module for your project that needs some additional string value - I can do this:

public static MySettingsExtensions 
{
  public static string GetMySetting(this IConsProvider provider) 
  {
    //TODO: argument null checks
    return provider["MySetting"];
  }

  public static void SetMySetting(this IConsProvider provider, string val) 
  {
    provider["MySetting"]=val;
  }
}

(Sorry had to update that last bit as for some reason I parameterised the key - which was pointless!)

That is - we can now start extending the range of strongly-typed settings offered by the provider via extension methods - without having to alter any of the original code.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the response, dont worry about the HttpContext.Current.Session["username"].ToString(); it was a very simplified example to ilustrate the problem at hand, we use public static T Get<T>(this HttpSessionState Sessionx, string key) and public static void Set<T>(this HttpSessionState Sessionx, string key, T value). About threading and so in sessions we suffered that problem too, it would be a bliss if the session state could be cloned easily or made accesible to the new thread in those cases... This solution seems fine, we will give it a try and mark as solved accordingly... –  ase69s Nov 21 '12 at 12:26
    
Putting this into practice one thing that would be useful is some way to enforce that the Cons class must implement the properties defined on the interface (so we dont left something out by mistake), this is done already in the case of WebConsProvider and DefaultConsProvider as it implements the interface and visual studio warns you when you left some property without implementation... Is there some C# sintax for this purpose? –  ase69s Nov 21 '12 at 16:27
    
no you're going to struggle with that one I'm afraid - the Cons class is a static and therefore can have no interface (or contract other than it's public methods) so realistically you just have to keep things in sync manually. However, as I've suggested I'd do away with the static wrappers entirely anyway - use instances of the interface only and you don't have to worry –  Andras Zoltan Nov 21 '12 at 16:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.