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I have an Ant script which checks out a project from CVS and then builds and deploys it. THe requirement is such that the script should be a part of the code in the "scripts" folder and every time a checkout is done the file will be over written. When the build is done without doing the CVS checkout everything works fine. My code snippet is

<target name="deploy.main"  depends="checkProperty" if="propertyExist">
    <echo message="${release.number}"/>
    <sequential>
    <parallel>
    <antcall target="tag.branch"/>
    <antcall target="checkout.main"/>
    </parallel>
    <antcall target="stopJboss" />
    <sleep seconds="10" />
    <antcall target="replaceTag"/>
    <antcall target="deploy" />
    <antcall target="moveConfigFiles" />
    <antcall target="promote"/>
    <antcall target="stopRemoteJboss"/>
    <parallel>
        <antcall target="startJboss" />
        <antcall target="startRemoteJboss"/>
    </parallel>
    </sequential>
</target>

This file is always overwritten by the new file during a checkout, does ant read the whole file at once at the start and keep it in memory? Or does it try to find things in the new file?

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Offtopic: Have you considered any CI solutions (say jenkins?). –  Jayan Nov 23 '12 at 5:31
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1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Any (and many tools like make) uses directed acyclic graph of dependency information. They construct the dependency information reading file in the single go. (This is done so that even if there are multiple dependencies to same target, it gets executed only once). Once the graph is constructed modifications to 'the' project file will not have any effect.

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