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Given:

a = 1
b = 10
c = 100

I want to display a leading zero for all numbers with less than 2 digits, i.e.:

01
10
100
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9 Answers 9

up vote 178 down vote accepted

Here you are:

print "%02d" % (1,)

Basically % is like printf or sprintf.

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5  
if you want to pass in a one-tuple use (1,). (1) ist just the value one which also works in this context. –  unbeknown Jan 26 '09 at 8:15
    
You are correct. Updated. Thanks. –  Jack M. Aug 9 '10 at 21:23
2  
Example: print "%05d" % result['postalCode'] for a 5 digit postal code. –  NickWoodhams Jun 5 '12 at 12:08
1  
x = "%02d.txt" % i raises TypeError (cannot concatenate 'str' and 'int' objects), but x = "%02d.txt" % (i,) does not. Interesting. I wonder where is that documented –  theta Nov 5 '12 at 18:10
    
@theta In 2.7.6, I don't get an error. Maybe this was a bug in a specific version of Python that they've since fixed? –  Jack M. Apr 4 at 14:51
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You can use zfill:

print str(1).zfill(2) 
print str(10).zfill(2) 
print str(100).zfill(2) 

prints:

01
10
100
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9  
I like this solution, as it helps not only when outputting the number, but when you need to assign it to a variable... e.g. x = str(datetime.date.today().month).zfill(2) will return x as '02' for the month of feb. –  EroSan Feb 24 '11 at 17:33
    
This is just great! Thanks Datageek! –  Yousui Sep 17 '13 at 19:05
1  
+1: This is my favorite. Runner up is .rjust(2, '0') –  ArtOfWarfare Nov 7 '13 at 16:48
    
No idea it existed +1 –  nutship Mar 28 at 14:10
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In Python 3, you would use the format() string method:

for i in (1, 10, 100):
    print('{num:02d}'.format(num=i))

or using the built-in (for a single number):

print(format(i, '02d'))

See the PEP-3101 documentation for the new formatting functions.

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-1: That won't work. Python's format uses curly braces, so print('{num:02d}'.format(num=i)) –  nosklo Jan 20 '09 at 12:41
1  
fixed it. No need for a "-1" ? –  Ber Jan 26 '09 at 0:43
4  
Ber: aren't we supposed to vote down answers that don't work? Removed -1. –  nosklo Jul 2 '09 at 1:50
    
@Ber - Actually, it was. If you answer was wrong, it should be buried until it's fixed. –  ArtOfWarfare Nov 7 '13 at 16:46
1  
Works in Python 2.7.5 as well. You can also use '{:02d}'.format(1) if you don't want to use named arguments. –  Jason Martens Jan 7 at 14:20
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x = [1, 10, 100]
for i in x:
    print '%02d' % i

results:

01
10
100

Read more information about string formatting using % in the documentation.

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7  
The documentation example sucks. They throw mapping in with the leading zero sample, so it's hard to know which is which unless you already know how it works. Thats what brought me here, actually. –  Grant Jul 1 '09 at 17:52
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Or this:

print '{0:02d}'.format(1)

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The pythonic way to do this:

str(number).rjust(string_width, fill_char)

This way, the original string is returned unchanged if its length is greater than string_width. Example:

a = [1, 10, 100]
for num in a:
    print str(num).rjust(2, '0')

Results:

01
10
100
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print '{:02}'.format(a)
print '{:02}'.format(b)
print '{:02}'.format(c)

prints:

01
10
100
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This way let you repeat the argument several times within the string: One zero:{0:02}, two zeros: {0:03}, ninezeros: {0:010}'.format(6) –  srodriguex Apr 14 at 21:00
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Use a format string - http://docs.python.org/lib/typesseq-strings.html

For example:

python -c 'print "%(num)02d" % {"num":5}'
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width = 5
num = 3
formatted = (width - len(str(num))) * "0" + str(num)
print formatted
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