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I need a layout with 2 columns where each column expand to the height of the taller column.

With table I would simply do:

<table class="parent">
    <tr>
        <td class="columnLeft">Column 1</td>
        <td class="columnRight">Column 2</td>
    </tr>
</table>

And column 1 & 2 will keep the same variable height.

With div there are some solution (involving use of overflow:hidden and more) that needs many hacks to work well cross-browser.

(jsFiddle here: http://jsfiddle.net/rJjJa/1/)

In this case I would simply use table, without needing the extra effort of CSS hacks (or lots of extra markup). Do you think table is fine for this?

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3  
As for as your reqs are concerned, you code is doing well but as per standards, tables are not recommended as design element. –  Rab Nawaz Nov 21 '12 at 12:49
    
Eeek, I would avoid tables if possible. Why not just set a background that makes it look as if both columns are extending to the same height? If you don't want to create the image for it you could always use a CSS gradient. colorzilla.com/gradient-editor –  Michelle Nov 21 '12 at 12:53
    
I need the central border not the background-color –  dynamic Nov 21 '12 at 13:32

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you want divs to behave just like a table, you could use display: table-cell; for each div. They should behave just like a td; both should be the same height. This should work in all modern browsers and ie8 and above.

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I think this is the best solution: display:table on the container and display: table-cell on the columns. However, it's worth nothing that you can't position relative to the table cells, only to the table, so unfortunately it's not usable in all cases. –  Eamon Nerbonne Nov 22 '12 at 9:45
    
If i want IE7 compatibility ? –  dynamic Nov 22 '12 at 16:05
    
yeah, that's a problem. I fortunately don't need to worry about IE7 anymore. I'd try to avoid investing in something destined to die in the near future, but whether that's OK for you really depends. –  Eamon Nerbonne Nov 22 '12 at 17:23

The tag <table> is outdated for layouts! Do not use it.

Instead, there are many Cross Browser CSS Compatible 2 Column Layouts, without using any hacks. One such is, Equal height columns.

Equal height columns

It does not matter how much content is in each column, the background colours will always stretch down to the height of the tallest column.

An article, explained in detail here: Equal Height Columns with Cross-Browser CSS.

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1  
Look at the solution he proposes: matthewjamestaylor.com/blog/… that's 40lines of CSS vs 0 required for table... I still don't know if table should be avoided so much in this case =/ –  dynamic Nov 21 '12 at 13:04
    
Best practise is to avoid tables. Check out this: webdesign.about.com/od/layout/a/aa111102a.htm –  Praveen Kumar Nov 21 '12 at 13:05
1  
I will stick with table in this case. I can't accept the fact I have to hackish around with container divs to get a simple results obatined with 3 tag using table –  dynamic Nov 21 '12 at 13:10
2  
This linked article isn't a great solution: its quite complex, and will likely interact poorly with other content and other css requirements. Not to mention the fact that lots of width as manually set in various places; meaning that you can't easily change anything without updating many different lines of code - surely a sign of poor programming practice. –  Eamon Nerbonne Nov 22 '12 at 9:43
1  
For example, I use css-based popups; and the linked articles usage of overflow:hidden means that popups inside a column won't properly overflow the column bounds but instead be cut off. –  Eamon Nerbonne Nov 22 '12 at 9:44

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