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I couldn't find any questions similar to this, so here it goes.

I need a Regular Expression that will validate a phone number. So first and foremost only numbers, dashes and a '+' is allowed.

The difficult part is allowing only expressions that start with any of the strings from the following set:

50  
51  
53  
57  
60  
66  
69  
72  
73  
78  
79  
88  

Any other numbers without those prefixes should not be allowed.

I'll be extremely grateful for any tips! Thanks!

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2  
Regular expressions differs in different programs. Grep and sed has it's own regexps, python has its own, perl has its own and so on. Which programming language you are using? –  werehuman Nov 21 '12 at 12:56
    
I am sorry, I was not aware of that. I need this expression for .NET WebForms 3.5 Validation Controls. –  barjed Nov 21 '12 at 12:57

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The prefix part is quite simple. ^ is an anchor, that represents the start of the string. Then just append your desired pattern (I believe you want to allow the plus as the first character):

^\+?(?:50|51|53|57|60|66|69|72|73|78|79|88)[\d-]+$

Note that the $ is the counterpart to ^ and ensures that your string does not contain non-digit non-dash characters after the phone number.

Of course the pattern at the end can be made a lot more specific to disallow consecutive dashes and such things.

Also note that \d in .NET matches any Unicode digit character. If that is not what you desire, use [0-9-].

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You need to tweak this, but here's a start:

^(50|51|53|57|60|66|69|72|73|78|79|88)\d+$
                                       ^
                                       |
                                       -----This part probably needs 
                                            more constraints, depending on 
                                            your format
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