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#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use warnings;
use 5.010;

my @names = ("RD", "HD", "MP");
my $flag = 0;
my $filename = 'Sample.txt';

if (open(my $fh, '<', $filename))
{
    while (my $row = <$fh>) 
    {
        foreach my $i (0 .. $#names) 
        {
            if( scalar $row =~ / \G (.*?) ($names[$i]) /xg )
            {
                $flag=1;
            }
        }

    }

    if( $flag ==1)
    {
       say $filename;
    }

    $flag=0;
} 

here i read the content from one file and compare with array values, if file contant matches with array value i just display the file. in the same way how can i access different file from different direcory and compare the array values with same?

share|improve this question
1  
Too much laziness in this post, I give up. –  StardustOne Nov 21 '12 at 13:04

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Q: How can I access a different file?
A: By specifying a different filename.


By the way: If you are using flags for loop control in Perl, you are doing something wrong. You can specify that this was the last iteration of the loop (in C: break), or that you want to start the next iteration. You can label the loops so that you can break out of as many loops as you like at once:

#!/usr/bin/perl
use 5.010; use warnings;

my @names = qw(RD HD MP);

# unpack command line arguments
my ($filename) = @ARGV;

open my $fh, "<", $filename or die "Oh noes, $filename is bad: $!";

LINE:
while (my $line = <$fh>) {
    NAME:
    foreach my $name (@names) {
        if ($line =~ /\Q$name\E/) { # \QUOT\E the $name to escape everything
            say "$filename contains $name";
            last LINE;
        }
    }
}

Other highlights:

  • using a foreach loop as intended and
  • removing the (in this context) senseless \G assertion

You can then execute the script as perl script.pl Sample.txt or perl script.pl ../another.dir/foo.bar or whatever.

share|improve this answer
    
This is exactly what I was typing out. Well, close enough anyway. –  titanofold Nov 21 '12 at 13:38
    
great,.amon thanks a lot for your great help, which is again working with single file., could u please help to handle the different file which is present in different directory... –  jcrshankar Nov 21 '12 at 14:16
    
@jcrshankar just loop over foreach my $filename (@ARGV){...} and specify all paths (relative or absolute) as command line arguments. –  amon Nov 21 '12 at 14:20

You can use the ~~ operator in Perl 5.10. Don't forget to chomp the trailing whitespace.

#!/usr/bin/perl

use 5.010;
use strict;
use warnings;

my @names = ('RD', 'HD', 'MP');

my $other_dir = '/tmp';
my $filename  = 'Sample.txt';

if ( open( my $fh, '<', "$other_dir/$filename" ) ) {

    ROW:
    while ( my $row = <$fh> ) {

        chomp $row; # remove trailing \n

        if ( $row ~~ @names ) {

            say $filename;
            last ROW;
        }
    }
}

close $fh;
share|improve this answer
    
Not quite. As you used it, the smart matching is equivalent to grep {$row ~~ $_} @names with this second smart-match interpreted as string equality. It kind of asks “Is $row in @name?” and not “Does any element of @name regex-match $row?” You can force the desired behaviour by turning @names into an array of regexes: @names = map qr/\Q$_\E/, LIST. Also, chomping is a no-op in this problem space. –  amon Nov 22 '12 at 22:04
    
Hm, I suppose you're right. Though the question didn't stipulate a regex match the sample code spells it out pretty clearly. In the case of a regex match the trailing \n would indeed be irrelevant. –  ddoxey Nov 23 '12 at 4:13

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