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I have a stylesheet I'm using with a perl module that only works with XSLT 1.0. I want to create a JSON array inside a JSON dictionary so I need proper comma seperation for the elements. I'm parsing an XHTML table where there are 1 or more spans in the second cell. So for-each select="./tr" and then for-each select="./td[1]/span" or something like that.

After changing it a little it behaves as expected as Ian said it would.

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet version="1.0" xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform">
<xsl:output method="text" version="1.0" doctype-system="http://www.w3.org/TR/xhtml1/DTD/xhtml1-strict.dtd" doctype-public="-//W3C//DTD HTML 4.01//EN"  encoding="UTF-8" />
    <xsl:template match="text()">
    </xsl:template>
    <xsl:template match="table/tbody">
        <xsl:text>[</xsl:text>
        <xsl:for-each select="./tr[not(@class='no-results')]">
            <xsl:text>{"</xsl:text>
            <xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(.//strong)" />
            <xsl:text>":{"ingredients":{</xsl:text>
            <xsl:for-each select=".//div[@class='reagent-list']//a[@class='item-link reagent']">
                <xsl:value-of select="substring(./@href, 14)" />:<xsl:value-of select="normalize-space(./span[1])" />
                <xsl:if test="position() != last()">
                    <xsl:text>,</xsl:text>
                </xsl:if>
            </xsl:for-each>
            <xsl:text>}</xsl:text>
            <xsl:if test="position() != last()">
                <xsl:text>,</xsl:text>
            </xsl:if>
            <xsl:text>&#10;</xsl:text>
        </xsl:for-each>
        <xsl:text>]</xsl:text>
    </xsl:template>
</xsl:stylesheet>

I realize that the stylesheet does not match the xml below. The actual document is huge. I hope you understand what I mean, though. I just made this up:

<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>a</th>
      <th>b</th>
      <th>c</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td><span>an element</span></td>
      <td>bar</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td><span>an element</span><span>an element</span></td>
      <td>bar</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td><span>an element</span><span>an element</span><span>an element</span><span>an element</span></td>
      <td>bar</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

=>

{
  "Row one":["an element"],
  "Row two":["an element", "an element"],
  "Row three":["an element", "an element", "an element", "an element"]
}

Instead I get this:

{
  "Row one":["an element",],
  "Row two":["an element", "an element",],
  "Row three":["an element" "an element" "an element" "an element"]
}

I've been using position() and last() in a test tag to print a comma and it seems to work correctly for the outer loop, but how do I tell my test tag to use the inner for-each scope when printing the commas that seperate the array?

share|improve this question
    
That's how position() and last() should already work in the inner loop - what exactly is not working as you expect? –  Ian Roberts Nov 21 '12 at 13:17
    
The commas are added as if it is checking the position of the outer loop element. Is my question poorly phrased or tagged? Thanks for taking a look at it. –  Jeppe Boelsmand Nov 21 '12 at 15:12
    
It's very hard to tell what's going on without seeing the actual XSLT code. If you are genuinely using the position() and last() functions directly inside the inner for-each (as opposed to inside a [] predicate somewhere) then it should work exactly as you expect it to... –  Ian Roberts Nov 21 '12 at 15:53
    
I totally understand that and I appreciate your input. It helped me a bunch. I also hadn't put in the } which was making the result even more obscure. Can I mark your comment as the solution? –  Jeppe Boelsmand Nov 21 '12 at 20:26

1 Answer 1

up vote 0 down vote accepted

As mentioned by @IanRoberts, it is difficult to give targeted assistance without seeing what your existing XSLT looks like.

That said, here is a solution that is push-oriented (i.e., no <xsl:for-each>) and does not require last().

When this XSLT:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"?>
<xsl:stylesheet
  xmlns:xsl="http://www.w3.org/1999/XSL/Transform"
  xmlns:my="my"
  exclude-result-prefixes="my"
  version="1.0">
  <xsl:output omit-xml-declaration="no" indent="yes" method="text" />
  <xsl:strip-space elements="*" />

  <my:ones>
    <num>one</num>
    <num>two</num>
    <num>three</num>
    <num>four</num>
    <num>five</num>
    <num>six</num>
    <num>seven</num>
    <num>eight</num>
    <num>nine</num>
  </my:ones>

  <xsl:template match="/*">
    <xsl:text>{&#10;</xsl:text>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="tbody/tr" />
    <xsl:text>&#10;}</xsl:text>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="tr">
    <xsl:variable name="vPos" select="position()" />
    <xsl:if test="$vPos &gt; 1">,&#10;</xsl:if>
    <xsl:text>&#09;"Row </xsl:text>
    <xsl:value-of select="document('')/*/my:ones/*[$vPos]" />
    <xsl:text>":[</xsl:text>
    <xsl:apply-templates select="td[2]/span" />
    <xsl:text>]</xsl:text>
  </xsl:template>

  <xsl:template match="span">
    <xsl:if test="position() &gt; 1">, </xsl:if>
    <xsl:value-of select="concat('&quot;', ., '&quot;')" />
  </xsl:template>

</xsl:stylesheet>

...is run against the provided XML:

<table>
  <thead>
    <tr>
      <th>a</th>
      <th>b</th>
      <th>c</th>
    </tr>
  </thead>
  <tbody>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td>
        <span>an element</span></td>
      <td>bar</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td>
        <span>an element</span><span>an element</span></td>
      <td>bar</td>
    </tr>
    <tr>
      <td>foo</td>
      <td>
        <span>an element</span><span>an element</span><span>an element</span><span>an element</span></td>
      <td>bar</td>
    </tr>
  </tbody>
</table>

...the wanted result is produced:

{
  "Row one":["an element"],
  "Row two":["an element", "an element"],
  "Row three":["an element", "an element", "an element", "an element"]
}

Explanation:

  • The first template matches the root element. It's purpose is to apply templates to that element's <tr> grandchildren and sandwich those results between { and } (adding newlines as appropriate).

  • The second template matches <tr> elements. It outputs row information and is instructed to apply templates to all <span> children of the second <td> element (again, sandwiching the results between braces and other text as necessary).

    • NOTE: instead of using last(), you'll see that the first element outputs a comma, followed by a newline, if the position of this <tr> in the current context is greater than 1. This has the same effect of applying commas correctly; it's merely a different way of looking at the same problem (and is what I use because it seems more efficient to me ;) ).

    • NOTE: to make this solution more extensible, you'll see that I'm not statically outputting the words "one", "two", etc. in each row. Instead, at the top of the XSLT, I've defined a <my:ones> element to hold onto the text values of each "ones" number. When processing each <tr>, I use the position of that <tr> in the current context to retrieve the correct <num> element's value. I've left it as an exercise to the reader, but it would indeed be possible to define <my:tens>, <my:hundreds>, etc. to scale this solution up to potentially large numbers of rows.

  • The final template matches <span> elements. Again, it uses an <xsl:if> element to test whether the position of this <span> in the current context is greater than 1; if so, a comma (followed by a space) is output. After that, we merely concatenate two " symbols with the value of the span sandwiched in-between.

share|improve this answer
    
This makes a lot of sense and is very explicit, but simplifying the test was even better. Thanks for looking at it. –  Jeppe Boelsmand Nov 21 '12 at 20:27
    
@JeppeBoelsmand - glad to help! –  ABach Nov 21 '12 at 21:17

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