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This is an SO challenge

I would like to know how someone would get an invalid formal parameters in a function without the arguments object to as simulate not knowing the format of the parameter destructuring assignment. This is not an ECMAScript question and only pertains to JavaScript.

Your mySolution cannot access arguments or test. You are provided with an args array which contains the parameter names. You must return an object which has a property for every parameter which is the parameter that was passed to the function. In short, results[prop] must === test[prop]. Your solution shouldn't rely on bugs or security holes as they may not be present in the future. The solution to this problem of which I have in mind does not rely on any bugs.

(function () {
    function mySolution ({
    	var,
    	this,
    	function,
    	if,
    	return,
    	true
    }) {
    	// prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
    	var test = arguments = null,

    	args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
    	results = {};

    	// put your solution here

    	return results;
    };
    var test = {
    	"var"     : {},
    	"this"    : {},
    	"function": {},
    	"if"      : {},
    	"return"  : {},
    	"true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
    	if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
    		if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
    			pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());

Here's one of the two possible solutions that I would have accepted:

(function () {
    function mySolution ({
    	var,
    	this,
    	function,
    	if,
    	return,
    	true
    }) {
    	// prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
    	var test = arguments = null,

    	args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
    	results = {};

    	var i = args.length;
    	while (i--) {
    		results[args[i]] = eval("function::" + args[i]);
    		// function::[args[i]] won't work unless you eval() it
    	}

    	return results;
    };
    var test = {
    	"var"     : {},
    	"this"    : {},
    	"function": {},
    	"if"      : {},
    	"return"  : {},
    	"true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
    	if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
    		if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
    			pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());

The solution works by using the default function:: namespace in combination with eval() scope.

For example: foo.function::bar and foo.function::['bar'] are the same thing foo.bar.

share|improve this question
2  
i didn't even know you could define functions like that: function f({a, b, c})! what's that all about? –  nickf Aug 28 '09 at 21:58
1  
@nickf: It's part of JavaScript 1.7's destructuring assignment. –  Eli Grey Aug 29 '09 at 0:57
    
I dint know about 'function::' thing. Gonna have good time reading about this. Awesome problem btw. –  Ashish Sep 7 '09 at 12:50
    
Ashish: You're going to have a hard time with that as it's not documented anywhere. Heck, I think I'm the only person to ever do as much as to even mention it on MDC. The function:: namespace is not mentioned in the E4X spec. It's main use is for adding methods to XML.prototype. XML.prototype.x = myFunc doesn't work but XML.prototype.function::x = myFunc does. –  Eli Grey Sep 7 '09 at 14:02
    
Ashish: If you want to read more I have a blog post about property namespaces in JavaScript 1.6+ that you may want to read: eligrey.com/blog/post/namespacing-properties-in-javascript –  Eli Grey Sep 7 '09 at 14:03

8 Answers 8

up vote 4 down vote accepted
+100

For 100 points


(function () {
    function mySolution ({
        var,
        this,
        function,
        if,
        return,
        true
    }) {
        // prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
        var test = arguments = null,

        args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
        results = {};

        // put your solution here
    	var getEscUnicode = function(str) {
    		var ret = "";
    		for(var j = 0; j < str.length; j++) {
    			var temp = parseInt(str.charCodeAt(j)).toString(16).toUpperCase();
    			for(var i=0; i < 5 - temp.length; i++) {
    				temp = "0" + temp;
    			}
    			ret = ret + "\\u" + temp;
    		}
    		return ret;

    	}
    	for(var i = 0; i < args.length; i++) {
    		results[args[i]] = eval(getEscUnicode(args[i]));
    	}
        return results;
    };
    var test = {
        "var"     : {},
        "this"    : {},
        "function": {},
        "if"      : {},
        "return"  : {},
        "true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
        if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
                if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
                        pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());

share|improve this answer
    
Congratulations, you actually figured out one of the two possible solutions to the challenge! Your solution relies on what I think is a bug and so if nobody finds the other solution by tomorrow I will mark this as the accepted answer. –  Eli Grey Sep 7 '09 at 4:26

Tested PASS in FireFox 3.0.13! I "cheated", by altering the Object prototype:

<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<script>
(function () {
    function mySolution ({
        var,
        this,
        function,
        if,
        return,
        true
    }) {
        // prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
        var test = arguments = null,

        args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
        results = {};

        // put your solution here
        Object.prototype._hasOwnProperty = Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty;
        Object.prototype.hasOwnProperty =
function(prop) {
 results[prop] = this[prop];
 return this._hasOwnProperty(prop);
}

        return results;
    };
    var test = {
        "var"     : {},
        "this"    : {},
        "function": {},
        "if"      : {},
        "return"  : {},
        "true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
        if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
                if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
                        pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());

</script>
</head>
<body>
<!-- Put the body of your page below this line -->

<!-- Put the body of your page above this line -->
</body>
</html>

Does this count? I guess it probably doesn't. =p

share|improve this answer
    
Also tested in IE7, but the script doesn't work at all (even if I delete my solution and just use the provided code on its own) –  RMorrisey Sep 4 '09 at 6:32
    
It doesn't count but it sure is a creative solution! I guess I'm going to have to make results be null to :P –  Eli Grey Sep 4 '09 at 15:15
    
Do I at least get a vote in case nobody else gets it, since I got the test to pass? ;) –  RMorrisey Sep 4 '09 at 17:59
    
Woo, I got a vote =) –  RMorrisey Sep 6 '09 at 5:50

Homework? Here's a hint: use eval.

share|improve this answer
    
No, this is not homework. And no, you can't eval("var") to get the value of the var parameter. –  Eli Grey Aug 28 '09 at 21:23
2  
If this isn't homework, then why the weird restrictions on what variables may be accessed, or what functions may be used? State your needs clearly. –  John Millikin Aug 28 '09 at 21:24
    
You may use eval, it's just that you CAN'T use eval as it won't help. –  Eli Grey Aug 28 '09 at 21:27
    
To add to that, there is one one restriction, not multiple restrictions. The one restriction is that you can't access arguments. –  Eli Grey Aug 28 '09 at 21:34

I can only think of one way to achieve this and even that one way relies on both - deprecated callee.caller and an already fixed FF peculiarity of eval being able to execute code in a context of a specified function.

What's interesting is that I think eval was "fixed" before function({...}){} extension was introduced, but I'm not totally sure.

I reduced test case slightly, but preserving an actual idea, of course.

I first tried accessing arguments off of a caller itself, but it looks like <fn>.arguments references same object as arguments within function context; nulling arguments object essentially destroyed object referred to by arguments property as well.

I also thought about evaling stack string from an error object (to get test values), but that would not solve anything, as test values are objects, not primitives.

(function () {
  function mySolution () {
    var test = arguments = null;
    return eval('test', (function(){ return arguments.callee.caller; })());
  };
  var test = {
    "var"   : {},
    "this"  : {},
    "function": {},
    "if"    : {},
    "return"  : {},
    "true"  : {}
  },
  results = mySolution(test),
  pass = true;

  for (var prop in test)
    if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
        if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
            pass = false;

  alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL");
})();
share|improve this answer
    
arguments.callee.caller isn't deprecated last I checked, just non-standard. The deprecated thing is arguments.caller. Your solution doesn't solve the challenge that is stated in my question though. My question involves actually getting the values of the formal parameters (ie. function(a){return a} gets the a formal parameter). –  Eli Grey Aug 29 '09 at 13:14
    
Also, please test your solution as it actually doesn't work in non-fixed or fixed JS engines. Given someFunction (which declares a private variable, a), eval("a", someFunction) doesn't return the private variable, "a". It returns someFunction.a if the property exists. –  Eli Grey Aug 29 '09 at 13:19
    
It does work and, yes, I did test it. Which "non-fixed or fixed JS engines" are you talking about? I haven't seen implementations that return someFunction.a when calling eval('a', someFunction), so I don't know where you're getting it from. Mozilla, on the other hand, had extension to evaluate code in a scope of a given function (i.e. using function's internal [[Scope]]) See bugzilla.mozilla.org/show_bug.cgi?id=442333. –  kangax Aug 29 '09 at 17:19
1  
Well you still are missing the point. Even if this does solve it, I nulled test for a reason, so you don't access it. If your solution works with destructuring assignment ({a,b,c}) in the arguments, I will make this as an answer. –  Eli Grey Aug 30 '09 at 11:08
    
I believe it does work in FF3.0.x –  kangax Sep 5 '09 at 1:49

Aha! I found a better answer, this time. (I have to admit that I got the general idea from kangax's answer, though). Tested PASS in FF 3.0.13:

<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<script>
(function () {
    function mySolution ({
        var,
        this,
        function,
        if,
        return,
        true
    }) {
        // prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
        var test = arguments = null,

        args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
        results = {};

        // put your solution here
        var o = eval('arguments', mySolution)[0];
        for(var prop in o) {
         results[prop] = o[prop];
        }

        return results;
    };
    var test = {
        "var"     : {},
        "this"    : {},
        "function": {},
        "if"      : {},
        "return"  : {},
        "true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
        if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
                if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
                        pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());

</script>
</head>
<body>
<!-- Put the body of your page below this line -->

<!-- Put the body of your page above this line -->
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
I'm not really sure why this works... it seems like maybe the eval() function has a special case for the 'arguments' property, where it doesn't use the same property that is used within the method itself? Or maybe the "arguments" being assigned the value "null" is actually not the method arguments array? –  RMorrisey Sep 4 '09 at 18:28
    
I tested in firefox 3.5.2 and it doesnt works "TypeError: eval('arguments', mySolution) is null" –  Cleiton Sep 4 '09 at 19:31
    
This does seem like the kind of thing that could be a bug in FF, fixed in a later version =( –  RMorrisey Sep 4 '09 at 20:17
    
As I already explained, this was a rather serious security hole in Mozilla (being able to evaluate string in a scope of arbitrary function). 3.0.13 still "works" (as RMorrisey noted), but 3.5 already doesn't. I think they fixed it shortly after 3.0. –  kangax Sep 4 '09 at 21:17

Attempt #3; again, tested PASS in FF 3.0.13

<html>
<head>
<title></title>
<script>
(function () {
    function mySolution ({
        var,
        this,
        function,
        if,
        return,
        true
    }) {
        // prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
        var test = arguments = null,

        args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
        results = {};

        // put your solution here
        var o = mySolution[0];
        for (var prop in o) {
           results[prop] = o[prop];
        }

        return results;
    };
    var test = {
        "var"     : {},
        "this"    : {},
        "function": {},
        "if"      : {},
        "return"  : {},
        "true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
        if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
                if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
                        pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());

</script>
</head>
<body>
<!-- Put the body of your page below this line -->

<!-- Put the body of your page above this line -->
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer
    
failed in firefox 3.5.2 –  Cleiton Sep 5 '09 at 16:12
    
You gotta be kidding me! –  RMorrisey Sep 6 '09 at 5:46

Tried lots of ways. Kind of given up. But if you can't break the system, change the system. MY solution:


(function () {
    function mySolution ({
        var,
        this,
        function,
        if,
        return,
        true
    }) {
        // prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
        var test = arguments = null,

        args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
        results = {};

        // put your solution here
/********** MY SOLUTION STARTS ******************/
    	return null;
    }
    function mySolution ({
        var,
        this,
        function,
        if,
        return,
        true
    }) {
        // new function does not prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
        //var test = arguments = null,

        args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return', 'true'],
        results = {};
    	for(var i =0; i < args.length; i++) {
    		results[args[i]] = arguments[0][args[i]];
    	}
/********** MY SOLUTION ENDS ******************/
        return results;
    };
    var test = {
        "var"     : {},
        "this"    : {},
        "function": {},
        "if"      : {},
        "return"  : {},
        "true"    : {}
    },
    results = mySolution(test),
    pass = true;

    for (var prop in test)
        if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
                if (results[prop] !== test[prop])
                        pass = false;

    alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL")
}());
share|improve this answer
    
Well of course arguments[0] has the object but the whole purpose of the challenge is to see if you can get the invalid parameters without replicating the deconstruction. –  Eli Grey Sep 5 '09 at 16:18
    
hey can you give a hint on how to go about solving this!! –  Ashish Sep 5 '09 at 20:40
(function () {
    function mySolution ({ var, this, function, if, return, true }) {
    // prohbit reference to arguments and the test object
    var test = arguments = null, args = ['var', 'this', 'function', 'if', 'return','true'], results = {};
    //LAME...
    };
    mySolution=function(a){var results=a;
    //LAME...
    return results;
};
var test = {
      "var" : {},
      "this" : {},
      "function": {},
      "if" : {},
      "return" : {},
      "true" : {} }, results = mySolution(test), pass = true;
 for (var prop in test)
        if (test.hasOwnProperty(prop))
            if (results[prop] !== test[prop]) pass = false;
 alert(pass ? "PASS" : "FAIL") }());
share|improve this answer

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