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In the example (regex.cpp), the author of the library created a custom struct (magic_number) and a validate function for this struct to show how custom struct can be integrated into program options. I followed his example to create a validate function for a custom class (MyClass). Compiler complains that a lexical_cast is not available for MyClass. I then implemented std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, MyClass& d), removed void validate(.., MyClass*, ..), the code compiles. Can anyone explain why the example doesn't require operator>>, while mine doesn't require validate?

EDIT:

#include <MyLib/MyClass.h>

std::istream& operator>>(std::istream& in, MyClass& obj) {
    // some code to populate obj
    return in;
}


po::variables_map parseCommandLine(int argc, char* argv[]) {

    po::options_description options("Options");
    options.add_options()
        ("help", "produce help message")
        ("obj", po::value<MyClass>(), "")
        ;
    po::variables_map vm;
    store(po::command_line_parser(argc, argv)
        .options(options).run(), vm);
    notify(vm);

    return vm;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {

    try {
        po::variables_map vm = parseCommandLine(argc, argv);

        MyClass obj = vm["my"].as<MyClass>();

        cout << obj << endl;
    } catch(std::exception& e) {
        cout << e.what() << "\n";
        return 1;
    }   
    return 0;
}
  • the code compiles without validate.

I also tried making minimum change to regex.cpp:

  1. remove magic_number
  2. add #include <MyLib/MyClass.h>
  3. replace all occurance of magic_number by MyClass.
  4. comment out all code in validate.
  5. This does not compile.

EDIT: add validate. None of them solved the compiler error.

void validate(boost::any& v, 
              const std::vector<std::string>& values,
              std::vector<MyClass>*, int)
{
}

void validate(boost::any& v, 
              const std::vector<std::string>& values,
              MyClass*, long)
{
}

void validate(boost::any& v, 
              const std::vector<std::string>& values,
              MyClass*, int)
{      
}

EDIT: It may relate to namespaces.

After I surrounded the validate function by namespace boost { namespace program_options { }}, the code compiled without overloading op>>. It also works if validate is put into the same namespace as MyClass. Can anyone explain this?

share|improve this question
    
Could we see how you declared your program_options object ? If there's no validate, there's no way to parse the object without op>>. – J.N. Nov 21 '12 at 14:06
1  
This is a compiler issue. See [the description of the problem here][1] [1]: stackoverflow.com/questions/13501598/… – Candy Chiu Nov 21 '12 at 21:24

The basic problem you are facing is that C++ doesn't offer any facility to convent a string to an arbitrary user object (I mean without writing any code).

To solve the problem, program_options offers two possibilities:

  • you implement operator>>, which is the standard C++ way of doing so, but which may have impact in some other areas (i.e. you may want to parse your object in a specific way except on the command line). Internally, boost::lexical_cast is used to implement the conversion and will throw an error if op>> is not found.
  • you implement the validate function, which is specific to program_options but that has no impact outside option management.

I guess it uses template meta programming to find out whether you have provided validate or it will default to lexical_cast.

I can't help you why your attempt with validate failed since you didn't provide the code for it.

Here is a working example, though:

#include <boost/program_options.hpp>
#include <vector>
#include <string>

namespace po = boost::program_options;

namespace lib {
   class MyClass
    {
    public:
        int a;
    };

    void validate(boost::any& v,
                  const std::vector<std::string>& values,
                  MyClass*, int)
    {
        po::validators::check_first_occurrence(v);
        const string& s = po::validators::get_single_string(values);
        v = boost::any(MyClass { boost::lexical_cast<int>(s) } );
    }
}


po::variables_map parseCommandLine(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    po::options_description options("Options");
    options.add_options()
        ("help", "produce help message")
        ("obj", po::value<lib::MyClass>(), "")
        ;
    po::variables_map vm;
    store(po::command_line_parser(argc, argv)
        .options(options).run(), vm);
    notify(vm);

    return vm;
}

int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
    try {
        po::variables_map vm = parseCommandLine(argc, argv);
        lib::MyClass obj = vm["obj"].as<lib::MyClass>();
        cout << obj.a << endl;
    } catch(std::exception& e) {
        cout << e.what() << "\n";
        return 1;
    }
    return 0;
}
  • Update

With a namespace, both the class and validate must belong to the same namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
The point is the program did NOT compile with an empty validate function. So it feels like the compiler somehow didn't pick up the validate overload and defaulted to use lexical_cast. BTW, your example is no different than regex.cpp. – Candy Chiu Nov 21 '12 at 15:06
1  
You probably declared your validate function wrong, but I can't help if you don't show me how you did. My sample compiles fine with an empty validate. – J.N. Nov 21 '12 at 15:08
    
I followed the signatures in boost/program_options/details/value_semantic.hpp – Candy Chiu Nov 21 '12 at 15:21
    
would you try putting MyClass in a namespace, for example, lib? – Candy Chiu Nov 21 '12 at 19:19
    
@CandyChiu I updated the answer to take the namespace into account. – J.N. Nov 21 '12 at 23:25

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