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I'm trying to structure text using regular expressions - splitting and grouping all managers in the following example format:

General MANAGER
John Doe
(123) 456 7890
abcdefg@netcare.co.za
Nursing MANAGER
John Doe
(123) 456 7890
abcdefg@netcare.co.za
Financial MANAGER
John Doe
(123) 456 7890
Human Resource MANAGER
John Doe (Acting)
(123) 456 7890
abcdefg@netcare.co.za
Marketing OFFICER
John Doe
abcdefg@netcare.co.za
Pharmacy MANAGER
John Doe
(123) 456 7890
abcdefg@netcare.co.za
Technical Services MANAGER
John Doe
(123) 456 7890
abcdefg@netcare.co.za

I've tried

(?<FOUND>^.*?(manager|officer)+.*?)(manager|officer)+

expecting it to group items like this:

General Manager
John Doe
(123) 456 7890
abcdefg@netcare.co.za

but it's not quite working. Can any regexpert tell me how to fix it?

I'm using http://regexhero.net/tester/ for testing with options: CultureInvariant, ExplicitCapture, IgnoreCase, Multiline, SingleLine

share|improve this question
    
Is your format consistent? i.e. do you have always 4 lines per contact? Position/name/email/phonenumber? –  Rui Jarimba Nov 21 '12 at 14:31
    
What's the input to the regex? –  J0HN Nov 21 '12 at 14:31
    
Thanks, but not quite right still. The only consistent thing is that manager\officer heads a section to separate. There's not necessarily anything else - like the same number of lines, or an email. I need the expression to be: from the beginning of a line containing MANAGER to the end of the line just before the next line containing MANAGER. –  Richard Nov 21 '12 at 15:12

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

With RegexOptions.Multiline | RegexOptions.IgnoreCase

 ^(?<Title>.*(?:Manager|Officer)).*\n(?<Name>.*)(?:\n(?!.*(?:Manager|Officer))(?<Detail>.*))+$

See: http://regexhero.net/tester/?id=1ac1bd9f-be0a-4bea-ac01-cc32a6605ae7

Retrieve values using

Match.Groups["Name"].Value
Match.Groups["Title"].Value
Match.Groups["Detail"].Captures[1..n].Value
share|improve this answer
    
Perfect, thanks so much! I see it's the negative lookahead that is the key. Out of interest, is it possible to have an explicit capture group in the expression (i.e. (?<name>))? Because I had trouble trying to keep lookaheads in the expression for the .* parts, but keep them out of the capturing group. –  Richard Nov 22 '12 at 6:48
    
Updated it to contain Name, Title and Details. That should work... –  jessehouwing Nov 22 '12 at 10:34

Provided the last character in the file is a newline, you might want to try a positive lookahead assertion at the end of your regular expression. Find all blocks that start with manager or officer and are preceded by either a manager or officer line or EOF.

(^.*?(manager|officer)(.*?$)*?)(?=(^.*?(manager|officer))|\Z)

However, if there really is little other structure than the fact that block data is ended when a new block starts, I personally would prefer the following old-fashioned approach:

# WARNING: pseudocode 
managers = []
for line in file:
    if 'manager' in line or 'officer' in line: 
        manager = new Manager(line)
        managers.append(manager)
    else:
        manager.set_data(line)
share|improve this answer
    
As long as it's OK to latch onto the @ in the e-mail, this clever trick should work. I am not certain that it's OK, though, in case an internal e-mail is specified. –  dasblinkenlight Nov 21 '12 at 14:38
    
You are right, I have modified the answer accordingly. –  Hans Then Nov 21 '12 at 14:42
    
Thanks, but not quite right still. The only consistent thing is that manager\officer heads a section to separate. There's not necessarily anything else - like the same number of lines, or an email. I need the expression to be: from the beginning of a line containing MANAGER to the end of the line just before the next line containing MANAGER –  Richard Nov 21 '12 at 15:13

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