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What does it mean if(!fork())? I'm a little bit confused about it, I dont know when Im in parent and child process:

if(!fork())
{
  // is it child or parent process?
}else{
  // is it child or parent process?
}
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7 Answers 7

up vote 7 down vote accepted

From the fork(2) manpage:

Return Value

On success, the PID of the child process is returned in the parent, and 0 is returned in the child. On failure, -1 is returned in the parent, no child process is created, and errno is set appropriately.

Since fork() returns 0 to the child, the if clause tests if it's a child:

if (!fork()) // same as: if (fork() == 0)
{
  // child
}else{
  // parent
}
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thats it, thanks! Now I Completly understand it! Thank you:) –  mazix Nov 21 '12 at 14:52
2  
Only issue is that it doesn't differentiate the parent from error. –  pmg Nov 21 '12 at 14:57
    
@pmg: given that it doesn't record the child pid either, presumably the parent doesn't care what happens to it. So maybe it doesn't care whether there's an error. –  Steve Jessop Nov 21 '12 at 15:00
1  
A simple program that only forks from one place could simply use wait (instead of waitpid) to wait for it, and thus would not need to record the pid. wait could even inform it that fork failed (since there would be no children to wait on). I would consider this very bad design though, because if you happen to be using any library code that forks to run external programs, you could wrongly end up reaping the library code's children instead of your own, and leaving your own as a zombie. It's best to always save the pid and always use waitpid. –  R.. Nov 21 '12 at 15:27

Do man fork , You will know more about it. It actually return pid_t which is actually int

On successful return it gives, 0 for the child process and positive value for parent process

Actually it's like this :

pid_t pid;
pid=fork();

if(pid <0)
{
 printf("fork failed");
 return -1;
}
else if(pid == 0) 
{
  it  is child process
}
else
{
  It is parent process
}

so when you do if(!fork()) it means definitly child process because !0 == 1 i.e. if conditon is true and it will execute the statements inside the if(!fork())

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because 0 can be used in a conditional as if it were a boolean, this is the same as asking:

if(fork() == 0) {

The documentation says:

On success, the PID of the child process is returned in the parent, and 0 is returned in the child. On failure, -1 is returned in the parent, no child process is created, and errno is set appropriately.

It is a common idiom to use integer values directly in a conditional when the coder only cares about "not 0" or 0 ("true" or "false").

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1  
now I get it:D Simple and short answer, thank you! –  mazix Nov 21 '12 at 14:50

The call to fork returns 0 in the child (if it works, of course) so the true (first) part of the if statement runs there (because !0 is true).

The false (second) part executes in the parent, whether fork succeeds (returning the PID of the child) or fails (returning -1).

I'm not that big a fan of this particular method since it doesn't account for all edge cases. I prefer something like:

pid_t pid = fork();
switch (pid) {
    case -1: {
        // I am the parent, there is no child, see errno for detail.
        break;
    }
    case 0: {
        // I am the child.
        break;
    }
    default: {
        // I am the parent, child PID is in pid, eg, for waitpid().
        break;
    }
}

With that setup, you know exactly what's going on, with no information loss.

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The values of fork() can be:

  • 0, which means it's a child

  • < 0, which is an error

  • > 0 parent, which mean it's a parent

Since if (!fork()) is just a short way of writing if (fork() == 0), it means:

if(!fork()) {
  // it is a child process
}
else {
  // it is a parent process
}
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if(!fork())
{
  /*  its child, as child would only be created on success and return 0 which would have been turned into true by ! operator */
}else{
  /* it is parent because either success or failed, fork would have returned nonzero value and ! would have made it false */
}

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That code doesn't check for errors from fork! When there are too many processes running already, or there is not enough memory fork will fails and your software will behave in probably a very odd way.

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